Poet’s Beat on Jazz Canvas ~Theories of Time and Space Written by Natasha Trethewey feat. Seattle Women’s Jazz Orchestra – The Hiding Place Art by Judith Redman

We Are All Human Canvas Print by  - Judith-Redman

We Are All Human Canvas Print by – Judith-Redman

Happy Tuesday Morning!  I have been searching for unique poets that reflect the mood and timbre of American culture and society.  It seems that the racial climate has once again dropped into our lives.  I am numb from the experience.  I feel that the test of time shows that matters relating to race are in the spotlight of the News media.  It makes things very complex and American culture is still dealing with the same memes.  This is why I selected Judith Redman’s painting above and Seattle Women’s Orchestra’s Hiding Place that reminds me of the Civil Rights Movement in 1965.  It seems that America has not learned from the past.  It is my hope that the matter be resolved in an amicable and non hostile manner.  Not be stuck in the quicksand of racism, insuperable chauvinism and most of all seeking harmony and peace because it is the only way to live with a joy of life that we can learn to express in acoustic and visual portraits that shows we have grown over the years.  Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

 

Theories of Time and Space

Written by Natasha Trethewey

  You can get there from here, though 

there’s no going home.


Everywhere you go will be somewhere
 
you’ve never been. Try this:


head south on Mississippi 49, one-
 
by-one mile markers ticking off


another minute of your life. Follow this
 
to its natural conclusion – dead end


at the coast, the pier at Gulfport where
 
riggings of shrimp boats are loose stitches


in a sky threatening rain. Cross over
 
the man-made beach, 26 miles of sand


dumped on a mangrove swamp – buried
 
terrain of the past. Bring only


what you must carry – tome of memory
 
its random blank pages. On the dock


where you board the boat for Ship Island,
 
someone will take your picture:


the photograph – who you were -
 
will be waiting when you return
 

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Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

 

 

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Poet’s Beat on Jazz Canvas ~“I have been a stranger in a strange land” by Rita Dove Featuring Kyle Eastwood – The Way Home Art by Adrian Piper

Adrian Piper since 1965

Adrian Piper since 1965

Adrian Piper is a painter, collagist and teacher of philosophy. She is an artist who deals mostly with issues of racism and sexism as they confront the black woman in her everyday life. Many of her artworks in the past have been very successful due to a direct and personnel approach. Piper has also been recognized for including typed print on her pieces. These remind the viewer of various artists during the pop era in the 1960s, when tied text or magazine articles were often part of artistic pieces.  Courtesy of Yale

Sometimes I feel lie Rita Dove because of the situations and circumstance of my birth.    The lines have been blurred by the imposed by American society and cultural differences.  My prologue set the stage for an adventurous and mysterious life.  When I was three years old mom opened my world to the power of words.  I read everything she brought home.  When I was eleven that was my prolific learning of jazz, art and words.  Being careful with my selections and following rules I made up.  I love seeing jazz, life and the world differently and always in the present tense.  Adrian and Rita share aspects of the vision that has taken place in my heart.  Kyle Eastwood sets the tone, ambiance and a great appreciation of that fact.  To this end, I hope you like the area I have chosen today.  Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

 

“I have been a stranger in a strange land”

by Rita Dove

Life’s spell is so exquisite, everything conspires to break it. ~ Emily Dickinson

 

It wasn’t bliss. What was bliss

but the ordinary life? She’d spend hours

in patter, moving through whole days

touching, sniffing, tasting . . . exquisite

housekeeping in a charmed world.

And yet there was always

 

more of the same, all that happiness,

the aimless Being There.

So she wandered for a while, bush to arbor,

lingered to look through a pond’s restive mirror.

He was off cataloging the universe, probably,

pretending he could organize

what was clearly someone else’s chaos.

 

That’s when she found the tree,

the dark, crabbed branches

bearing up such speechless bounty,

she knew without being told

this was forbidden. It wasn’t

a question of ownership—

who could lay claim to

such maddening perfection?

 

And there was no voice in her head,

no whispered intelligence lurking

in the leaves—just an ache that grew

until she knew she’d already lost everything

except desire, the red heft of it

warming her outstretched palm.

 

Source: Poetry (October 2002).

musical_note_clip_art_12518

Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Poet’s Beat On Jazz Canvas ~ The World Is a Beautiful Place by Lawrence Ferlinghetti featuring Diana Krall – Let’s Face The Music And Dance Art by Jacob Lawrence

Art Scene by Jacob Lawrence

Art Scene by Jacob Lawrence

It is a beautiful world when there is so much to experience and being present to see all of the beauty that resides in our hearts and comes out in so many forms of expression.  I just wonder sometimes if we could forget about the challenges and worries for a spell and let our eyes see, hear and feel the intensity of our life in full bloom expressing what we can imagine and to put it down on a canvas in terms of endearment and mystery. I believe that living in the moment is like absolute freedom.  Where people do not judge, classify or worry about anything because we are on a wave that reaches down to our core and touches the heavens.  Mindfulness comes in the simplest ways.  We just need to let things go, and let things come to lift our hearts and dance to the rhythm that is free to take us to the edge of life’s universe.  These artistic expressions do just that for me.  Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

The World Is a Beautiful Place

by Lawrence Ferlinghetti 

The world is a beautiful place
to be born into
if you don’t mind happiness
not always being
so very much fun
if you don’t mind a touch of hell
now and then
just when everything is fine
because even in heaven
they don’t sing
all the time

The world is a beautiful place
to be born into
if you don’t mind some people dying
all the time
or maybe only starving
some of the time
which isn’t half bad
if it isn’t you

Oh the world is a beautiful place
to be born into
if you don’t much mind
a few dead minds
in the higher places
or a bomb or two
now and then
in your upturned faces
or such other improprieties
as our Name Brand society
is prey to
with its men of distinction
and its men of extinction
and its priests
and other patrolmen

and its various segregations
and congressional investigations
and other constipations
that our fool flesh
is heir to

Yes the world is the best place of all
for a lot of such things as
making the fun scene
and making the love scene
and making the sad scene
and singing low songs and having inspirations
and walking around
looking at everything
and smelling flowers
and goosing statues
and even thinking
and kissing people and
making babies and wearing pants
and waving hats and
dancing
and going swimming in rivers
on picnics
in the middle of the summer
and just generally
‘living it up’
Yes
but then right in the middle of it
comes the smiling

mortician

musical_note_clip_art_12518

Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artisthttp://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

 

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Jazz on Canvas ~ Four Mindfulness Improvisational Steps to Find Your Life’s Wake feat. Francesco Santucci – Last Train to Heaven ~ Artwork by Romare Bearden

Romare Bearden Jazz Collage

Romare Bearden Jazz Collage

I am in the present. I cannot know what tomorrow will bring forth. I can know only what the truth is for me today. That is what I am called upon to serve, and I serve it in all lucidity.” ~ Igor Stravinsky

It is a beautiful morning here in Seattle and I wish you great health, a very long life, success in all your endeavors and most of all awesome joy. Most folks are capable of setting goals of things they want to accomplish in their lives.  But that is not where the riff comes in; it comes in how the heck we intend on doing that!  We all make resolutions as a routine ritual for New Year’s, but, unfortunately one fourth of those resolutions are forsaken after fifteen weeks.  Could it be that setting up goals is easy enough but when the first sign of trouble or difficulty arises that is when sticking to your dream and waiting through the strife goes out the window?  This is what  separates girls from women and boys from men happens.  I say this because I have lived this cycle of being hopeful, making plans and end by giving up  at the first sign of difficulty or say …”it was only a resolution”  Living this cycle has created a tremendous  hardship in my life. I had a lot personal habits I wanted to get rid of or change, but due to lack of self-discipline and mindfulness improvisation, I was not able to do so.

Live in Music Inspired by Romare Bearden, by k Madison Moore

Live in Music Inspired by Romare Bearden, by k Madison Moore

Here are four mindfulness improvisational strategies based on Jazz Lifestyles that changed and improved  and transformed my life that worked and made me feel like I am capable of living life to the fullest and could handle any riffs or licks that came into my life.

· Romare Bearden Estate; art  Copyright Licenced by Romare Bearden Foundation

· Romare Bearden Estate; art Copyright Licenced by Romare Bearden Foundation

Step One: Getting Centered
Mindfulness improvisation creates the inner stillness that is the key ingredient for “listening” our soul’s calling to us. It is what I have found when I pray, I have to wait for the answer.  Sometimes it is the answer you don’t want to get.  Sometimes it seems irrelevant but it is a necessary step for us.  That is what I learned from my father, he was composing a song that he could construct from listening intently and connected with the sound and story emanating from within.

Facing the challenge to Getting Centered
Suffering a loss of job or someone can create a sense of sadness and confusion making centering virtually impossible. Taking small steps at a time can make all the difference.  You will be acknowledging your pain and loss and not being “hard” on ourselves will provide a nurturing state rather than a guilty state.  Mindfulness improve is the surface from which our worst emotional pain rises, crests, breaks and withdraws like a wave of the surf. Mindfulness improv allows you to stay mentally and physically still while  we acoustically and visually observe the process giving us the experience, knowledge and courage to face whatever our lives may bring.

How to get into a mindfulness improvisational state
Getting into mindfulness state is simply sit or lie down and focusing on your breaths.  Sometimes it helps to intentionally slow the intake and pause for a few seconds then exhale.   Let’s say you are upset or angry about something, you would breathe in all of what is bothering you, hold it for a few moments, then slowly exhale slowly releasing your issues.  You would do this until you feel relaxed and at peace.

 

Romare Bearden art in harlem renaissance

Romare Bearden art in harlem renaissance

Step Two: Living Your Truth
This step is about getting a better understanding of ourselves and is not some metaphysical state that springs forth with some mythical epiphany.  It is getting a better understanding of yourself by acknowledging what is happening to you, what is happening within you and through improvisation you resolve those issues based on what your truth is with respect to that specific circumstance.  My truth on the same situation might be totally different.  Also, when you share your circumstance with others, you will find how they would handle it and take from that your truth.  When we own our truth positive changes begins to transform you. The truth really does set us free.

Obstacles to Knowing the Truth
You may want to hide from the truth because once it’s out in the open, it will cause your life to change or you fear you will not be liked. That’s always scary however spoken truths  that emanates from the heart are always cause change that is positive in the long run, despite the discomfort you experienced at first. It is the best way to face and overcome your fears.

How to recognize your Truth
After doing a mindfulness meditation and have dealt with a person or situation that you want to handle through improv, there are questions you can answer so you can improvise a plan of action.  Ask yourself… What is really going on in my life right now?  What is my truth about how I honestly feel about the situation?  What is the compassionate answer to this situation right now?

 

The Blues by Romare Bearden

The Blues by Romare Bearden

Step Three: Feeling in order to Improvise Your Soul’s Desires
Most folks go through life believing they will find happiness and success through other people.  Believing that if I get married all of my troubles will disappear.  Or if I get a good job and make a lot of money and become rich I will be happy.  But in all honesty you are conditionally living your life.  That one circumstance will make your life so much better.  If we use mindfulness improvisation to identify what we are facing and finding ways that all parties will benefit is living in the moment.  Improvisation means living in the moment; using lies or manipulating others is,
Obstacles to Improvising
A lot of folks take what other people describe as desires and not identifying our own is the best way to go about life.  We abandon our ability to separate ourselves from our tribes, i.e., families, peers and most of all our culture. The soul reveals what we want and need, while the mind allows us to think we know what we want and need.

How to use Mindfulness Improv to Know Your Soul’s Desires
That is where visioning and seeing what comes to mind when you set up a sheet of paper that has “Things I want.” You free write whatever  comes to your mind.  On the second sheet of paper you would write “Things I yearn for.”   Once again you will free write things that are completely different from your want page.  You will discover when reviewing both Want and Desire pages that does not automatically lead to freedom, intimacy and self-acceptance. It is okay, if immediately you don’t know how the universe intends to fulfill your soul’s desires.  The secret is to let go of outcomes and confusion of what you truly need from what you want will manifest the second you let go and allow the process to happen.  I can honestly say that has always been a truth for me.  Also, I don’t always get what I want, but I do always get what I need.

Romare Bearden

Romare Bearden

Step Four: Trust that your life is unfolding gracefully
Why Trust brings Grace into our lives

Completely letting go of desires and outcome you achieve a sense of non-attachment.  This frees you from depending and relying on Outcomes.  The art of letting go is a naturally occuring spiritual result of trust.  Your relationship and trust in God will fulfill its own nature by answering your soul’s requests, once you have identified and acknowledged them. To sit patiently with the anticipation that has not yet been fulfilled, and to trust that, that fulfillment will come true, is indeed the most powerful “spiritual gift” that human beings are capable of.
How to Trust through Applied Love
You begin by opening your heart to Hope!   Your trust in the universe and the process to bring into light your soul’s desires is what is necessary to have your dreams fulfilled.

You can start by making a wish or request then listen intently to a song you love.  Take time to ensure that your feeling is really coming from your soul. Then, intentionally choose to trust that your wish will be fulfilled. Sit back close your eyes and watch and feel how your feelings and desires have shifted and your reward is a great and peaceful feeling.  Sometimes letting go allows us to get what we need.  Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

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Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

 

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Poet’s Beat on Jazz Canvas ~ Take This River by Henry Dumas featuring Seattle Women’s Jazz Orchestra – “Pura Emoción”

Courtesy of  Corey Barksdale Abstract Arts

Courtesy of Corey Barksdale Abstract Arts

Good Morning!  I came across this poem by Henry Dumas.  It speaks to a special place in my heart considering my journey and enjoying visual and acoustic portraits of the challenges we all face in life.  Welcome to my world!  Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

 

 

TAKE THIS RIVER

by  Henry Dumas



We move up a spine of earth
That bridges the river and the canal.
And where a dying white log, finger-like,
Floating off the bank, claws at the slope,
We stumble, and we laugh.
We slow beneath the moon’s eye;
Near the shine of the river’s blood face,
The canal’s veil of underbrush sweats frost,
And this ancient watery scar retains
The motionless tears of men with troubled spirits.
For like the whole earth,
This land of mine is soaked….

Shadows together,
We fall on the grass without a word.
We had run this far from the town.
We had taken the bony course, rocky and narrow,
He leading, I following.
Our breath streams into October
As the wind sucks our sweat and a leaf…

“We have come a long long way, mahn.”
He points over the river
Where it bends west, then east,
And leaves our sight.

“I guess we have,” I pant. “I can hear
My angry muscles talking to my bones.”
And we laugh.

The hood of night is coming.
Up the river, down the river
The sky and night kiss between the wind.

“You know,” Ben says, “this is where
I brought Evelyn….
Look. We sat on that log
And watched a river egret
Till it flew away with the evening.

“But mahn, she is a funny girl, Aiee!
But she looks like me Jamaica woman….
But she asks me all the questions, mahn.
I’m going to miss her mahn, Aiee!

“But I will . . . Ewie. Ewie I love you,
But I do Ewie . . . Ewie . . . ,” he says
And blows a kiss into the wind.
Broken shadows upon the canal
Form and blur, as leaves shudder again…again

“Tell me this, Ben,” I say.
“Do you love American girls?
You know, do most Jamaicans
Understand this country?”

We almost laugh. Our sweat is gone.
He whispers “Aiee” on a long low breath

And we turn full circle to the river,
Our backs to the blind canal.

“But I’m not most Jamaicans….
I’m only Ben, and tomorrow I’ll be gone,
And … Ewie, I love you….
Aiee! My woman, how can I love you?”

Blurred images upon the river
Flow together and we are there….

“What did she ask you?” I say.
“Everything and nothing, maybe.
But I couldn’t tell her all.”
We almost laugh. “‘Cause I
Don’t know it all, mahn.

“Look, see over there….
We walked down from there
Where the park ends
And the canal begins

Where that red shale rock
Down the slope there . . . see?
Sits itself up like a figure,
We first touch our hands . . .
And up floats this log,
Not in the river
But in the canal there
And it’s slimy and old
And I kick it back . . .
And mahn, she does too.
Then she asks me:
Bennie, if I cry
When you leave would you
Remember me more?’
Aiee! She’s a natural goddess!
And she asks me:
‘Bennie, when you think of Jamaica
Can you picture me there?’
And while she’s saying this,
She’s reaching for the river
Current like she’s feeling its pulse.
She asks me:
‘Bennie, America means something to you?
Maybe our meeting, our love? has
Something to do with America,
Like the river? Do you know Bennie?’
Aiee, Aiee, mahn I tell you
She might make me marry . . .
Aiee! Ewie, Jamaica . . . moon!
And how can I say anything?
I tell her:
Africa, somewhere is Africa.
Do you understand,’ I say to her,
And she look at me with the moon,
And I hear the wind and the leaves
And we do not laugh . . .
We are so close now no wind between us . . .
I say to her:
‘Ewie, I do not know America
Except maybe in my tears….
Maybe when I look out from Jamaica
Sometimes, at the ocean water….
Maybe then I know this country….
But I know that we, we Ewie….
I know that this river goes and goes.
She takes me to the ocean,
The mother of water
And then I am home.’
And she tells me she knows
By the silence in her eyes.
I reach our hands again down
And bathe them in the night current
And I say: ‘Take this river, Ewie….’
Aiee, wind around us, Aiee my God!
Only the night knows how we kiss.”

He stands up.
A raincloud sailing upon a leak, whirs
In the momentary embrace of our memories….
“Let’s run,” I say, “and warm these bones.”
But he trots a bit, then stops,
Looking at his Jamaica sky.
“Let’s run the long road west
Down the river road,” I say,
“And I’ll tell you of my woman….Aiee.”
We laugh, but we stop.
And then, up the spiny ridge
We race through the trees
Like spirited fingers of frosty air.
We move toward some blurred
Mechanical light edged like an egret
And swallowed by the night.
Into this land of mine.
And the wind is cold, a prodding
Finger at our backs.
The still earth. Except for us.
And from behind that ebon cloak,
The moon observes….
And we do not laugh
And we do not cry, And where the land slopes,
We take the river….
But we do not stumble,
We do not laugh,
We do not cry,
And we do not stop….

Online Source: http://www2.mdcc.edu/north/asili/volii_3/nu00031.htm
Copyright © Loretta Dumas and Eugene Redmond, 1989/99

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Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Poet’s Beat ~ “Transformation & Escape” by Gregory Corso feat.Gil Fuller & Monterey Jazz Festival – Things Are Here – Feat. Dizzy Gillespie

For Kandinsky-Great grandson Anton S. Kandinsky

For Kandinsky-Great grandson Anton S. Kandinsky

This is a prelude to an understanding and appreciation for poetry and jazz in terms of harmonic complexities and spontaneous or improvisation utterances from the soul of the poet in both an acoustic and literary styles.  The American social and literary movement of the 1950s and ’60s brought out the artists’ communities in San Francisco, Los Angeles, and New York.  For me, I had the best of all of these locations growing up and experimenting with sounds and words and colors.  Its modality was expressed alienation from conventional society and advocated personal expression and illumination infused with an awareness and higher state of consciousness.  The Beat poets, included Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso who sought to liberate poetry from academia creating verse that was syncopated extrapolations of American life that was sometimes sprinkled with missives, and digressions but very powerful and moving.  It was a time that was riddled with LSD and mushrooms from Kerouac that I felt was not truly an expression of genius but a drug induced state that smacked of “Alice in Wonderland” perspective leaving out the key elements of Jazz Poetry and its impact in our lives.  This poem I believe establishes that.  Peace Out! JBC 8-)

 

 Transformation & Escape

BY GREGORY CORSO

1

 

I reached heaven and it was syrupy.

It was oppressively sweet.

Croaking substances stuck to my knees.

Of all substances St. Michael was stickiest.

I grabbed him and pasted him on my head.

I found God a gigantic fly paper.

I stayed out of his way.

I walked where everything smelled of burnt chocolate.

Meanwhile St. Michael was busy with his sword

hacking away at my hair.

I found Dante standing naked in a blob of honey.

Bears were licking his thighs.

I snatched St. Michael’s sword

and quartered myself in a great circular adhesive.

My torso fell upon an elastic equilibrium.

As though shot from a sling

my torso whizzed at God fly paper.

My legs sank into some unimaginable sog.

My head, though weighed with the weight of St. Michael,

did not fall.

Fine strands of multi-colored gum

suspended it there.

My spirit stopped by my snared torso.

I pulled! I yanked! Rolled it left to right!

It bruised! It softened! It could not free!

The struggle of an Eternity!

An Eternity of pulls! of yanks!

Went back to my head,

St. Michael had sucked dry my brainpan!

Skull!

My skull!

Only skull in heaven!

Went to my legs.

St. Peter was polishing his sandals with my knees!

I pounced upon him!

Pummeled his face in sugar in honey in marmalade!

Under each arm I fled with my legs!

The police of heaven were in hot pursuit!

I hid within the sop of St. Francis.

Gasping in the confectionery of his gentility

I wept, caressing my intimidated legs.

 

2

 

They caught me.

They took my legs away.

They sentenced me in the firmament of an ass.

The prison of an Eternity!

An Eternity of labor! of hee-haws!

Burdened with the soiled raiment of saints

I schemed escape.

Lugging ampullae its daily fill

I schemed escape.

I schemed climbing impossible mountains.

I schemed under the Virgin’s whip.

I schemed to the sound of celestial joy.

I schemed to the sound of earth,

the wail of infants,

the groans of men,

the thud of coffins.

I schemed escape.

God was busy switching the spheres from hand to hand.

The time had come.

I cracked my jaws.

Broke my legs.

Sagged belly-flat on plow

on pitchfork

on scythe.

My spirit leaked from the wounds.

A whole spirit pooled.

I rose from the carcass of my torment.

I stood in the brink of heaven.

And I swear that Great Territory did quake

when I fell, free.

Gregory Corso, “Transformation & Escape” from The Happy Birthday of Death. Copyright © 1960 by New Directions Publishing Corporation. Reprinted with the permission of New Directions Publishing Corporation.

Source: Mindfield: New and Selected Poems (New Directions Publishing Corporation, 1989)

 

musical_note_clip_art_12518

Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Poet’s Beat on Jazz Canvas ~ “Sleeping with the Dictionary” by Harryette Mullen featuring Betty Carter – “I Could Write A Book – Edit”

Dictionary Page Art

Dictionary Page Art

Welcome to my world, it is filled with writing, writing and oh yes more writing.  However, when I am not writing, sleeping, eating…my research is both auditory and visual albeit contemporary visual art, literary art, jazz arts, I would consider it a minimalist life in the sense that my gratitude for what God has blessed me with Life and all the natural things that come into it.  I love this writing life, you know, there will always be something to read, research or experience, what more could I ask for?  Peace Out!  JBC  8-)

 

Sleeping with the Dictionary

BY HARRYETTE MULLEN

I beg to dicker with my silver-tongued companion, whose lips are ready to read my shining gloss. A versatile partner, conversant and well-versed in the verbal art, the dictionary is not averse to the solitary habits of the curiously wide-awake reader. In the dark night’s insomnia, the book is a stimulating sedative, awakening my tired imagination to the hypnagogic trance of language. Retiring to the canopy of the bedroom, turning on the bedside light, taking the big dictionary to bed, clutching the unabridged bulk, heavy with the weight of all the meanings between these covers, smoothing the thin sheets, thick with accented syllables—all are exercises in the conscious regimen of dreamers, who toss words on their tongues while turning illuminated pages. To go through all these motions and procedures, groping in the dark for an alluring word, is the poet’s nocturnal mission. Aroused by myriad possibilities, we try out the most perverse positions in the practice of our nightly act, the penetration of the denotative body of the work. Any exit from the logic of language might be an entry in a symptomatic dictionary. The alphabetical order of this ample block of knowledge might render a dense lexicon of lucid hallucinations. Beside the bed, a pad lies open to record the meandering of migratory words. In the rapid eye movement of the poet’s night vision, this dictum can be decoded, like the secret acrostic of a lover’s name.

Harryette Mullen, “Sleeping with the Dictionary” from Sleeping with the Dictionary. Copyright © 2002 by the Regents of the University of California.  Reprinted by permission of University of California Press.

Source: Sleeping with the Dictionary (University of California Press, 2002)

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Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Part One ~ The Book Proposal for My Memoir: A Song From My Father: A Creative Journey of Race and Legacy ~ featuring Gil Fuller & Monterey Jazz Festival – Things Are Here –Performed by Dizzy Gillespie

I thought it would befitting to tell you that today is my birthday.  Also, last night I had an Aha! Moment when I realized that my website Fifty Shades of Jazz is a composite on canvas of my life….  Importantly it is a composite of the various aspects of my life.  That being said, I feel that I can conceive that there are more than just one book …1- my Breast Cancer journey with my mother (“Saved By Jazz), 2.  Jazz Poetry and Contemporary Visual Arts (“Visual & Acoustic Muse of Jazz), 3.  The one closest to my heart and what I need to write first…Memoir (“A Song From My Father:  A CREATIVE JOURNEY OF RACE AND LEGACY.

The album above would be the companion because it would provide the acoustic substrate for living in the 60’s during the Civil Rights Movement and Countercultural revolution that changed the face and life of America.  I would like to point out that my age is nothing but a number because it my no means does any justice to my challenges and finding meaning in my life or mindfulness improvisations that I learned from my father in the life lessons in jazz.  That jazz creates the same creative inspiration and my instrument and I have to play the utterances that manifest when listening to the sounds that are translated into words.  I would love to know what you are thinking when reading this post because it is the best way to know if I am making the sounds come true in my words.  Besides I love hearing from you…  Thank you for sharing my birthday with me…Peace Out!  JBC

Doodles and sketches for memoir

Doodles and sketches for memoir

Part One

Overview

 

If you were to put  bestsellers  filled  with ingredients  like jazz, culture, life lessons and being a musician, personal transformation and sustainability in MOVING TO HIGHER GROUND:  HOW JAZZ CAN CHANGE YOUR LIFE; civil rights riots, insuperable chauvinism, the search for racial identification in America in THE COLOR OF WATER:  A BLACK MAN’S TRIBUTE TO HIS WHITE MOTHER; or have a consciousness raising of living the life you were meant to live as portrayed in DREAMS OF MY FATHER:  A STORY OF RACE AND INHERITANCE add a dash of cross generational creative spiritual journeys amidst the Civil Rights and Counterculture movements of the 50’s and 60’s  in her father’s life it was a passion and dedication to notes and in her life she had fallen in love with the sound of words and jazz, you would be reading A SONG FROM MY FATHER:  A CREATIVE JOURNEY OF RACE AND LEGACY.

In this lyrical, sentimental, and compelling memoir, the daughter of a Creole father and a white American mother searches for her voice and a sustainable creative meaning to her life as a Multiracial American.  It begins in New York in the 1950s on the Upper Westside where her father’s music career as an accomplished  Jazz composer/arranger and band leader take off and who wrote a song for her when she was three years old that inspires a creative spiritual journey in Los Angeles California in the 1960 decade..

The memoir will be divided into five parts of a song:

Overview

If you were to put  bestsellers  filled  with ingredients  like jazz, culture, life lessons and being a musician, personal transformation and sustainability in MOVING TO HIGHER GROUND:  HOW JAZZ CAN CHANGE YOUR LIFE; civil rights riots, insuperable chauvinism, the search for racial identification in America in THE COLOR OF WATER:  A BLACK MAN’S TRIBUTE TO HIS WHITE MOTHER; or have a consciousness raising of living the life you were meant to live as portrayed in DREAMS OF MY FATHER:  A STORY OF RACE AND INHERITANCE add a dash of cross generational creative spiritual journeys amidst the Civil Rights and Counterculture movements of the 50’s and 60’s  in her father’s life it was a passion and dedication to notes and in her life she had fallen in love with the sound of words and jazz, you would be reading A SONG FROM MY FATHER:  A CREATIVE JOURNEY OF RACE AND LEGACY.

In this lyrical, sentimental, and compelling memoir, the daughter of a Creole father and a white American mother searches for her voice and a sustainable creative meaning to her life as a Multiracial American.  It begins in New York in the 1950s on the Upper Westside where her father’s music career as an accomplished  Jazz composer/arranger and band leader take off and who wrote a song for her when she was three years old that inspires a creative spiritual journey in Los Angeles California in the 1960 decade..

The memoir will be divided into five parts of a song:

~ Part One – Prelude will begin with a grace note of appreciation to my father.  Jazz as an Imitation of American Life will be a narrative of the author’s life  living immersed in 60’s Watts Riots and how the jazz world became her refuge and salvation.  Feature an article entitled THE UNRECOGNIZED TITAN by Leonard Feather, DOWNBEAT Magazine Feburary, 1966

~  Part Two  –  Measures – will lyrically capture how the author’s exposure to jazz rehearsals and interactions with musicians and writers provided a catalyst to living a creative life as a writer no matter what.  It is what one has to do to live with music or will die with noise and chaos.

~ Part Three – Chorus – will chronicle what the author discovered how mindfulness meditation and improvisation are the elements in jazz that musicians  used to make it through the strife and still expressing oneself as a way of coping and dealing with racism and chauvinism and hostility to be present and lean into her life actualizing a sense of serenity, a peace that thrives on understanding and acceptance. with grace

~ Part Four ~ Bridges – • Homecoming  the author was living in San Francisco, when she found out in November of 1989 that both of her parents were sick and I decided to come home to New York.  On her father’s deathbed the author had a chance to talk intimately with her father and tell him how miserable she felt because she was not living the life she felt was meant for her and wanted him to show her how and if he ever thought she had talent to write.  We came to an understanding before he died and I forgave him liberating us to transition opening his heart to die.

~ Part Five CODA – Finding My Way  – the author discovers the Gibson guitar her father kept for her in the basement and when opening it she realized that he kept all of my poems and journals nestled between the guitar and sheet music and a note he wrote ~ To My Daughter ~ I always knew you could write your heart out and I wrote a song for you to help you to discover that you cannot live without exploring and developing her gifts.

 

The memoir has approximately 75,000 words to date. The manuscript will be completed twelve months after receipt of the advance to help defray editing and publishing costs. It will be written under the pseudonym of Jannat Marie.

musical_note_clip_art_12518

 

Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Jazz Mindfulness Improv Conversations ~ Improv on the Brain ~ The Unspoken Language study of Charles Limb by Nick Zagorski

“Unlike during spoken conversation, when processing music, the brain shuts down areas linked to meaning and activates areas linked to syntax and structure. This allows musicians to focus on playing and responding to music within an intuitive framework. “We think that to be creative, you have to have this weird dissociation in your frontal lobe,” says Limb. “One area turns on, and a big area shuts off, so that you’re not inhibited, so that you’re willing to make mistakes, so that you’re not constantly shutting down all these new generative impulses.” Discoveries such as these in musical neuroscience lead to a better understanding of how the brain innovates and can help scientists develop new treatments for neural disorders.”  Music, the Unspoken Language by Trinica Sampson 2/20/2014 for The Utne Reader Blog:  Cure Ignorance

 

My neuroscience training and research on Mindfulness Improv in jazz and as a way of living in the present and facing the challenges that come into our lives i.e., cancer, losing your job, tapping into your inner vision of who you are, I discovered these studies and wanted to share them th you as I write my breast cancer survival story.  These studies are hidden treasures giving us a glimpse of our inner life.  This is an article that explains neuroscience and improvisation by Nick Zagorski. Tout de suite…Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

Jazz Improv The Unspoken Language

Jazz Improv The Unspoken Language

Through his studies of the brain “on jazz,” music-loving otolaryngologist Charles Limb aims to unravel the mind’s secrets of creativity.

By Nick Zagorski | Photo by Keith Weller

Watch a video about Charles Limb and his studies.
David Kane had never played keyboard quite like this. Sure, the 53-year-old musician and composer had experienced his share of cramped recording studios and poorly tuned pianos during his 37-year career. But those inconveniences paled in comparison to this session. Kane lay prostrate in an MRI tube, with a miniature electronic keyboard perched on his knees. He relied on a set of mirrors to visualize his fingers on the keys.

“Physically, it wasn’t too uncomfortable,” he jokes today, “but for my creative space, it was horrible.” Kane, though, persevered and played some jazz, in the name of music—and science. For right outside the MRI machine, scientist Charles Limb stared intently at a computer monitor, observing Kane’s brain activity as he played a combination of pre-written and improvised melodies. Limb’s goal? No less than trying to unravel the secrets of human creativity.

Images of a brain scan by Charles Limb

Images of a brain scan by Charles Limb

Three-dimensional surface projection of activations and deactivations associated with improvisation during jazz. Illustration courtesy Charles Limb.

“How do the legends, musicians like John Coltrane, get up on stage and improvise music for an hour or sometimes more?” asks Limb, a professor of otolaryngology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and an adjunct faculty member at Peabody. “How do they produce masterpiece after masterpiece without any preparation?”

Answering those questions appears daunting, as creativity may be the most enigmatic component of the human brain. But with the aid of sensitive imaging equipment, Limb and his collaborator Allen R. Braun at the National Institutes of Health have started gathering some tantalizing clues about the mind’s creative process.

“During improv, the brain deactivates the area involved in self-censoring, while cranking up the region linked with self-expression,” Limb explains. “Essentially, a musician shuts down his inhibitions and lets his inner voice shine through.”

It doesn’t take long to understand the roots of Limb’s ambitious endeavor. If the latest issues of Bass Player, Downbeat, and Electronic Musician spread across his desk don’t give it away, a short conversation about anything music-related certainly will. He is not shy to admit: “I’m a self-professed music addict.”

“This work provides us with another way we can relate musical creativity and improv to students. Maybe someday we can even apply these and future studies to create an environment that is more conducive to improvisation.” — Michael Formanek, Jazz Studies faculty

A talented saxophonist—he directed a jazz band while an undergraduate at Harvard and played at local restaurants during medical school at Yale—Limb is also a composer, studio engineer, music historian, and collector (with an instrument library that includes a Rhodes piano and a Chapman stick). In his rare free time away from his cochlear implant surgeries and family life, Limb shares his passion for music by writing magazine articles and speaking at symposia, on topics ranging from the potential damage of loud music on hearing, to Thomas Edison’s ability to invent a phonograph in spite of his deafness.

Music’s seductive power, according to Limb, is that it embodies the same principles as life itself. “Life and music are both equal parts rational and emotional,” he says. “Fundamentally, music is purely mathematical. Guitar strings, drum heads, even the human voice box, they all generate sound at defined, periodic frequencies; but when you hear all those sounds intertwined in music, it is truly an emotional experience.”

In the halls of Peabody however, Limb focuses on the rational side of music. For the past three years he has been an adjunct professor in the Computer Music Department, a discipline that explores the intersection of music, humans, and machine. Limb offers seminar courses on how researchers use computers to understand the role of the brain in music perception and production.

Limb also uses his Peabody connections to tap music students to join his lab at the Medical Institutions, a lab that also includes Hopkins students from otolaryngology and neuroscience. The mix offers a diverse range of expertise for looking into the neural basis of music.

Limb’s work in the area began in 2003, after he took a fellowship with Braun at the National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). Braun’s lab was using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to track how the brain processes language and how disorders like stroke disrupt speech. “That led me to think that we could use this same approach to study people while they were doing musical things,” Limb says.

It turned out that Braun was also a connoisseur of music, especially jazz, and had in fact been mulling a similar approach, so he quickly approved the idea. Their first project tested if musical training might affect the brain’s architecture, a hypothesis that proved to hold true. When both musicians and non-musicians were presented with a series of rhythmic patterns, only the musicians activated a portion of the left side of the brain associated with language comprehension. “Basically, musicians, do indeed ‘hear’ music differently than other individuals,” says Limb. “It’s almost like a second language.”

The pair of jazz-loving scientists then tackled a more ambitious plan. From its long, impromptu riffs to the tradition of “trading fours,” jazz has long been synonymous with improvisation. While other studies had focused on what happens in the brain when a person listens to music, few had looked at brain activity when music is being spontaneously composed. So, they figured, why not try to analyze jazz improvisation?

Admittedly, the logistics were daunting. Limb and Braun needed to figure out how to get a musician to play an instrument containing no magnetic parts while lying inside a cramped MRI tube. They overcame the technical issue with the help of a California engineer who custom designed a miniature, non-magnetic keyboard and a system of mirrors so the player could see the modified keyboard resting on his knees. Through his connections at Peabody and the Baltimore-D.C. jazz community, Limb then found six trained jazz pianists, including Kane, who were willing to serve as volunteers.

The musicians were asked to perform four different exercises while lying in the fMRI machine. First they played the C-major scale. Then they were asked to improvise on the scale. Next, they played an original blues melody (composed by Limb) that they had memorized, with a pre-recorded jazz quartet playing in the background. Finally, they were set free to improvise their own tune with the same recorded quartet.

When it came time to analyze the brain scans, Limb and Braun found strikingly similar patterns during improvisation—whether with the simple C scale or longer riffs with the jazz quartet. The brain turned off areas linked to self-monitoring and inhibition and turned on those that let self-expression flow. In addition, the brain regions involved with all the senses lit up during improvisation, indicating a heightened state of awareness—the performers literally taste, smell, and feel the air around them. Most fascinating about this aspect of the scans was their uncanny similarity to patterns seen during deep REM sleep, creating a tantalizing notion of a connection between improvisation and dreaming.

Of course, these results naturally resonated with trained musicians like Kane and Michael Formanek, professor of Jazz Studies at Peabody and an improviser. “When I start improvising, I definitely feel like I’m ‘going into a zone,’ so to speak, getting to a place where I’m not actively thinking about notes and rhythm but rather just taking in what’s around me,” says Formanek.

“It’s a strange little balance you have to achieve,” adds Kane about this altered state of improv consciousness. “You can’t have full judgment, because if you start thinking your improvisation stinks or is great, you’ll hinder your own creativity.”

Energized by his findings, Limb is eager to use music in future studies as a means for better understanding creativity. “I think our study highlights that you can address your most ambitious questions systematically,” he says. “And in the future there’s no reason we can’t ask other pertinent neurological questions like where musical talent really comes from, and how continued playing improves our performance.”

Limb is not shy about discussing the potential for such studies in his seminar courses. His goal: to excite and invigorate the next generation (of musicians and non-musicians alike) to pursue such questions.

Formanek, who teaches jazz bass and jazz history, agrees that the science behind music could be a useful educational tool for music initiates—like many of the students who come for classes at the Peabody Preparatory. “This work provides us with another way we can relate musical creativity and improv to students and kick-start them into thinking about music, and what kinds of events may trigger certain responses,” he says. “Maybe someday we can even apply these and future studies to create an environment that is more conducive to improvisation.”

But will attempts to quantify musical talent demystify the creative process? Limb doesn’t think so. People in the jazz world have already gravitated to his work and have given quite positive feedback. “Just because you understand how something works does not strip it of its beauty,” he says. “In some ways, knowing how creativity forms, the combination of chemical reactions, makes it even more remarkable.”

Functional imaging of music could have practical applications as well. As a cochlear surgeon, Limb envisions designing a music-based hearing test sensitive enough to detect hearing loss at its earliest stages, or to detect minor auditory defects that standard tests may miss. Such a diagnostic may be especially useful to assess deafness in young children or people recovering from strokes—those who have trouble communicating and thus cannot respond to standard tests.

A music-based diagnostic may even entice musicians, many of whom are surprisingly reluctant to have their hearing assessed, Limb has found. “Musicians often work in environments that are potentially quite damaging to their ears,” and incidences of hearing loss and tinnitus (buzzing in the ears in the absence of sounds) are on the rise. “Yet so few of the musicians I know have formally checked their hearing,” he says. “And one big reason is they don’t want doctors putting any tubes in their ears for fear of damage.”

Ultimately, says Limb, the imaging studies that he and Braun are pursuing can be extended to art forms that emphasize other senses, such as writing or painting, to compare brain activities and see if spontaneity can somehow be generalized. Gaining such knowledge will have broad implications, he notes, since improvisation isn’t limited to the arts; it’s an integral part of daily life.

“People improvise every day in their conversations or actions,” points out filmmaker and Peabody alumnus Michael Lawrence (BM ’70, Guitar), who plans to feature Limb in his upcoming documentary on Johann Sebastian Bach (another renowned musical improviser). “So with this landmark study, Charles has begun to define what it means to be human.”

Reprint by Science writer Nick Zagorski writes from Bethesda, Md. FALL 2008

 

rhythm primer rest

Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

 

 

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Jazz on Canvas Presenting ~ The Invitation by Oriah featuring Lana Ross – American Native Blues Shaman Guitar Song (feat. Andrei Krylov)

Modern Art Paintings 21st.-.-Merello.-_Pietro_di_Milano

Modern Art Paintings 21st.-.-Merello.-_Pietro_di_Milano

The Invitation by Oriah I credit for giving me the vision of using my love of words, jazz and mindfulness improvisation to tell my story.  I am not famous or rich, do I have to be?  I don’t think so, because what I do have much love for  is literary arts,  contemporary visual arts and yes jazz.  Now don’t get me wrong, but I feel that I have been on this planet for over half a century and the most endearing and heart felt awakenings were centered around being paralyzed and was renting a wheelchair through the Christmas holidays in 1990 and the big “C” (breast cancer) in 2000 that was by no means a wake up call, it was time to give my life all I had to help my mother and commrads in arms to stand tall and kick some major but on my way to realizing that improv is a powerful weapon and I am not my cancer.  I found that friends that I had known for awhile no longer knew what to say to me or ‘spiritually’ challenged individuals that alluded to my getting the illness because I questioned my faith and did something to offend the Higher Power.  Growing up in L.A. as a mixed raced little girl left me suspended between two worlds and when the Civil Rights movement dropped into an already smoldering situation there was fire, glass shard showers amid a smoked filled environment that was destined to infiltrate our black and white television sets.  The Jazz festival in Monterey 1965 was my “Invitation” to experience how men and women jazz musicians, stylist, arrangers, composers reflected their experiences and emotions that told a story of finding serenity, love and strength when faced with racism, chauvinism, and unfair wages still told their story that everyone who listened could understand.  I have learned to accept that racism will always be, but, it has become my choice to not let it stain my life.  To that end, I give you this poem that conjured up an awakened spirit that all of us have and have discovered through WordPress, amazing bloggers who really are what their hearts have been blessed to be.  Mixed race in my world includes ‘Native American‘ which my great grandpa a Calligrapher of Maps who showed me a different type of light.  Take Care, Peace Out!  ” tout de suite” because now is something we all have together….JBC 8-)

The   Invitation

by Oriah

It doesn’t interest me

what you do for a living.

I want to know

what you ache for

and if you dare to dream

of meeting your heart’s longing.

 

It doesn’t interest me

how old you are.

I want to know

if you will risk

looking like a fool

for love

for your dream

for the adventure of being alive.

It doesn’t interest me

what planets are

squaring your moon…

I want to know

if you have touched

the centre of your own sorrow

if you have been opened

by life’s betrayals

or have become shrivelled and closed

from fear of further pain.

I want to know

if you can sit with pain

mine or your own

without moving to hide it

or fade it

or fix it.

I want to know

if you can be with joy

mine or your own

if you can dance with wildness

and let the ecstasy fill you

to the tips of your fingers and toes

without cautioning us

to be careful

to be realistic

to remember the limitations

of being human.

It doesn’t interest me

if the story you are telling me

is true.

I want to know if you can

disappoint another

to be true to yourself.

If you can bear

the accusation of betrayal

and not betray your own soul.

If you can be faithless

and therefore trustworthy.

I want to know if you can see Beauty

even when it is not pretty

every day.

And if you can source your own life

from its presence.

I want to know

if you can live with failure

yours and mine

and still stand at the edge of the lake

and shout to the silver of the full moon,

“Yes.”

It doesn’t interest me

to know where you live

or how much money you have.

I want to know if you can get up

after the night of grief and despair

weary and bruised to the bone

and do what needs to be done

to feed the children.

It doesn’t interest me

who you know

or how you came to be here.

I want to know if you will stand

in the centre of the fire

with me

and not shrink back.

It doesn’t interest me

where or what or with whom

you have studied.

I want to know

what sustains you

from the inside

when all else falls away.

I want to know

if you can be alone

with yourself

and if you truly like

the company you keep

in the empty moments.

 

 

1999 All rights reserved By Oriah © Mountain Dreaming, from the book The Invitation published by HarperONE, San Francisco,

 

Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

 

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Between the Notes: A Breast Cancer Survival Guide ~ Discovering the Transformative and Healing Powers of Words, Mindfulness Improv and Jazz – Overview

This is an excerpt from the Memoir….

 Music is the space between the notes…”  ~ Claude Debussy

My mother and I were more than best friends forever (BFF’s), we were sister warriors in the battle against breast cancer.  This journey began over sixteen years ago on October of 1997 after dad died.  I was truly blessed because mom taught me the significance and grace of unconditionally loving another person, and she has always encouraged me and supported me in every aspect of my life.  We stemmed the tides of loss, grief and pain throughout the whole process.  We were each other’s caregivers.  Dad introduced and taught me using valuable jazz lessons how to handle the rigors of the harsh realities of choosing to live a creative life.  Looking back I realized it was his way of preparing me to stand my ground and confront my ego, negative thoughts, fear, failure and the challenges that we all face by accepting that like change it is necessary for us to connect with our God given spiritual gifts.  Leaning in and coming face to face with a challenge it signals that you have to awaken to those gifts using them to overcome it.  You will accept that you will be transformed by mindfulness improvisation in order to connect with the higher voice that will inspire and change you.  When listening becomes the ability to discern the ego and the chatter of negativity from what resides in your heart.  It wasn’t an option.  It was like breathing.   I have to write because it gives me the sense of who I am.  It was the response to the Call(ing) to the life that has been given you.  That is why when I combined jazz music that was a blessing my dad gave me when he took me to rehearsals, festivals, recording sessions;  and his introduction to the players, Dizzy GillespieJames MoodyCount BasieIgor Stravinsky, and Ralph Gleason that  individually and collectively inspired me to nurture and dedicate myself to a creative life.  I thought I was secretly writing in my journals — poetry and lyrical prose/essay that I created when dad was composing songs on the piano downstairs in 1963.  I was surprised to found that he knew all about my writing secretly in my room when I found in the Gibson guitar case he gave me when I was 9.  I opened it up and found all of my writing nestled between sheet music.  It was my Aha! Moment when I realized what a blessing my father gave me of living wonderfully enchanted life of musical thinking where my words can separate sound from music. Writing was my Response to my life’s calling.

The minute the word cancer entered our house, everything changed. I felt desperate and frightened by the prospect of cancer and another death.  But I refused to take this lying down.  I dove directly into the cresting wave of the unknown and sprung into action—there were logistics to deal with and mom needed support.  I moved back in with her after dad’s death and we struggled with missing dad, but also dealing with taxes and issues related to her therapy.

Chemotherapy is brutal. Radiation was something way beyond that.. The goal of these therapies is to kill everything in your body before it kills you. I wanted to take the burden off her. When dad had his massive stroke he was on a respirator and in a coma we asked my brother to make a tape of dad’s music to play continuously in his ears.  After ten days, he was out of the coma and was breathing on his own.  You can’t tell me that God didn’t have a role in that.

I decided to bring a tape of his music into the chemo suite when she had chemo and radiation therapy and it majestically made the most terrifying moments evaporate from both of us. It not only served as a connection between the two of us, it was a connection for the other patients and the hospital staff as well.   We laughed and interacted with one patient in particular, Pat.  Pat had colon cancer.  It had metastasized and spread to her bone.  I met her when I had my mastectomy and she lay in the bed next to me after surgery.  Mom came in and waited for me to come around.  I opened my eyes and there they were.  What a beautiful sight.  Apparently mom and Pat formed a bond.  When mom had the pick put in, Pat hovered over me like a lioness guarding her cubs.  After the pick was in mom, she developed a serious infection they could not control.  After a week, mom was moved to a nursing home in Paramus New Jersey for 90 days.  I couldn’t drive so Pat would come and sit on my bed holding the phone while we talked to mom and talked until the nurse came in and told us she would have the phone removed. Mom had two daughters now.  That spring all we did was laugh and act silly….More to come… See you between the notes, Peace Out! JBC-8)

rhythm primer rest

Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

 

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Jazz on Canvas Riffshots on A Short Course on Jazz Improvisation feat. Bill Evans – “Blue Monk” ~ Liner Notes of Bill Evans on Language & Improvisation

 

Courtesy of Wikipedia Japanese Art of 60s

Courtesy of Wikipedia Japanese Art of 60s

 

Beginning in the Jazz Age, Japan’s fascination with jazz seems limitless. Japanese musicians often interpret western sounds and musical styles with amazing results, it captures the flow that is moving and shaping  original sounds in ways that only occur through Japanese aesthetic. Art Critics and Scholars puzzle over cultural interpretation and translation, Japanese jazz musicians love to create new music that  highlights the greatest elements of the American cultural tradition moving beyond o unfamiliar creative spaces.

 

 

Bill Evan’s brought this out in the liner notes on the “Patch of Blue” Album cover.  It speaks to Debussy’s quote “Music is the space between the notes”.  Evan’s uses “Silence“ as a metaphor for “Space”.  He beautifully illustrates this through Japanese Visual Artist’s vision and style.  Enjoy Jazz through Sight, Sounds and Vision…Peace Out!  JBC 8-

 

 

On Silence

 

“There is a Japanese visual art in which the artist is forced to be spontaneous. He must paint on a thin stretched parchment with a special brush and black water paint in such a way that an unnatural or interrupted stroke will destroy the line or break through the parchment. Erasures or changes are impossible. These artists must practice a particular discipline, that of allowing the idea to express itself in communication with their hands in such a direct way that deliberation cannot interfere.

“The resulting pictures lack the complex composition and textures of ordinary painting, but it is said that those who see well find something captured that escapes explanation.

“This conviction that direct deed is the most meaningful reflection, I believe, has prompted the evolution of the extremely severe and unique disciplines of the jazz or improvising musician.”

(In such paintings the influence of Zen Buddhism, with its emphasis on the Void, on clearing. is visible in the predominance of empty space. Cf. Evans’s piano, Davis‘s trumpet, Creeley’s emulation of Davis.)

 

 

Japanese translation for meaning

Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Jazz RiffShots ~ Timbre ~ Coloring Outside of Life feat. New Age Jazz “Chakra Balancing Jazz Experience”

Ruth-Batke-Abstract-art-Emotions-Love-Contemporary-Art-Contemporary-Art

Ruth-Batke-Abstract-art-Emotions-Love-Contemporary-Art-Contemporary-Art

For the moment, the jazz is playing; there is no melody, just notes, a myriad tiny tremors. The notes know no rest, an inflexible order gives birth to them then destroys them, without ever leaving them the chance to recuperate and exist for themselves…. I would like to hold them back, but I know that, if I succeeded in stopping one, there would only remain in my hand a corrupt and languishing sound. I must accept their death; I must even want that death: I know of few more bitter or intense impressions.  ~ Jean-Paul Sartre

It is 7:00 pm on this very warm summer evening in August 11th, 1965 mom, dad, my brother and myself are watching the news when suddenly an interrupting announcement filled the air… This just in a California Highway Patrolman Lee W. Minikus, a Caucasian, was riding his motorcycle along 122nd street, just south of the Los Angeles City boundary, when a passing Negro motorist told him he had just seen a car that was being driven recklessly. Minikus gave chase and pulled the car over at 116th and Avalon, in a predominantly Negro neighborhood, near but not in Watts. It was 7: 00 p.m.

The driver was Marquette Frye, a 21-year-old Negro, and his older brother, Ronald, 22, was a passenger. Minikus asked Marquette to get out and take the standard Highway Patrol sobriety test. Frye failed the test, and at 7:05 p.m., Minikus told him he was under arrest. He radioed for his motorcycle partner, for a car to take Marquette to jail, and a tow truck to take the car away.

They were two blocks from the Frye home, in an area of two-story apartment buildings and numerous small family residences. Because it was a very warm evening, many of the residents were outside.  Ronald Frye, having been told he could not take the car when Marquette was taken to jail, went to get their mother so that she could claim the car.

 

Abstract Art Landscape Tree Painting

Abstract Art Landscape Tree Painting

 

Dad turned the volume down …this is not going to end well.  I am sure that a riot is going to break out and will escalate until its devastated effects will be realized.  Your mom and I have shielded you from the ugliest side of racism.  The screen had an alert began flashing and the anchorman reading a bulletin… The Emergency Control Center at Police Headquarters – a specially outfitted command post – was opened at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday. That day, one hundred and ninety deputy sheriffs were asked for and assigned. Between 6:45 and 7:15 p.m., crowds at the scene of the trouble of the night before had grown to more than 1,000. Firemen who came into the area to fight fires in three overturned automobiles were shot at and bombarded with rocks. The first fire in a commercial establishment was set only one block from the location of the Frye arrests, and police had to hold back rioters as firemen fought the blaze. Shortly before midnight, rock-throwing and looting crowds for the first time ranged outside the perimeter. Five hundred police officers, deputy sheriffs and highway patrolmen used various techniques, including fender-to-fender sweeps by police cars, in seeking to disperse the mob. By 4:00 a.m. Friday, the police department felt that the situation was at least for the moment under control. At 5:09 a.m., officers were withdrawn from emergency perimeter control.

We watched in horror the feeling of hatred, racism and violence is now infecting our family room.  I am so sleepy that I stood up and heading upstairs mommy and daddy I am going to bed.  Promise me that we are going to be safe.  My father muted the sound holding his arms open, I ran to him and mom for a hug.  He whispered, do you remember when we were driving cross country last summer to see Grandma and Grandpa in New York and when we were in Arizona the man tried to run us off the road?  Nodding yes, I protected us then with my army issued rifle and everything turned out fine, right?  I will always protect you, that’s always going to be my promise to you all.  Good night honey, we will talk in the morning…I climbed the stairs to my room, in the darkness I lay awake searching for serenity and comfort.  Flashbacks of  squatting on the floor of the backseat of our ’64 Ford Torino station wagon hanging on and being jolted because the driver in the other car was side swiping us and trying to move out of the way so dad could get is rifle.  Tears staining my pillow I fell asleep afraid to dream and felt the worst was yet to come…Pease Out!

We are about to revisit those times when 1965 Civil Rights was in the forefront setting a maelstrom of fire, anger, violence across the country galvanizing America and the world to announce to the world the revolutionary transformative cultural challenge has come to life.  As a result, retaining its African-American roots, principles and aesthetics, jazz has become one of the world’s first truly global music styles. The centrality of ‘mindfulness improvisation, maintaining fluidity of collective and collaborative nature of jazz’s influence enables us to have a vision that will reveal new traits without sacrificing identity.

I was born with a pen in my mouth.  I am also a visual person.  Jazz was my first language.  Sounds emanated from a place deep inside of me and the only way I could express myself was through sight and sounds.  It was a ‘mindfulness improvisation’ that began before I could speak.  It became the secret life of liner notes that would save my life some day.  For now, the gifts that God gave me were about to come to life.   Using mindfulness improvisation as an instruction manual that gives formulas to help us face challenges, fears and civil strife are transformed and awakened to who we are meant to be.  It is what I would like to call Mindfulness Improvisation because you have to be present with your fears in order to transform and causes you to grow and discover your gifts.  We are born with these gifts, however, some are just natural proclivities and what we like to do.  To carry this thought further, challenges bring about the hidden gifts and abilities  that are dormant in all of us.  Destiny is the difference between what should be from what you are meant to be.

My initial discoveries more than 20 years ago on my spiritual path and facing Breast Cancer allowed me to see that there is a bigger picture of life, a level of reality beyond a mere human experiential life.   These awareness’s shifted my perception tremendously and awakening a visioning process that is developed as a way of mindfulness improvisation that creates a new insight.  So let life challenges begin, we are transforming and awakening to the gifts we are giving and creating terrains and vistas  of adventure and amazement to an ever evolving life!  Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

rhythm primer rest

Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Jazz Bytes ~ Rawsome Zucchini Pasta Marinara by Chef Gena Hamshaw feat. Seattle Women’s Jazz Orchestra – Nisqually Riff

It is 80 degrees and sunny and the humidity is low in the Pacific NW.  It is a gorgeous day to do what I like to refer to as my eazy peazy summer day and this recipe is absolutely delicious and fits right in.  Bon Appétit!  Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

 

vegan-zucchini-pasta_ Courtesy of food52_MarkWweinberg_

vegan-zucchini-pasta_ Courtesy of food52_MarkWweinberg_

 

Author Notes: This is one of the simplest way to eat zucchini noodles, and one of the best. The marinara sauce is raw — nothing more than blended tomatoes and some seasoning — but in spite of that it manages to taste rich and complex. – Gena Hamshaw  Serves 4

  • 3cups vine-ripened or heirloom tomatoes, chopped
  • 1/2cup red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1/2cup sun-dried tomatoes, chopped (you can use tomatoes that are oil-packed and drained, or tomatoes that are dried and have been rehydrated in boiling water, then drained)
  • 1clove garlic, minced

Blend the tomatoes, pepper, sun-dried tomatoes, garlic, maple syrup, sea salt, black pepper, thyme, and basil in a blender or a food processor till relatively smooth. Drizzle in the olive oil with the motor of the machine running, and keep blending till the sauce is smooth. Season to taste, and set the sauce aside.

  1. Use a spiralizer, a vegetable peeler, or a box grater to cut your zucchini into noodle shapes. Divide the zucchini onto four plates, and top each with about half a cup of the marinara sauce. Garnish each plate with a tablespoon of chopped basil, and serve.

Japanese translation for meaning

Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

 

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Jazz on Canvas ~ Apology Of Genius by Mina Loy feat. Thurston Moore’s “Mina Loy”

La Maison en papier_drawing and gouache by Mina Loy 1906 Courtesy of Michael Duncan Collection

La Maison en papier_drawing and gouache by Mina Loy 1906 Courtesy of Michael Duncan Collection

Born in England Mina Loy worked as a poet and visual artist in Paris, Florence, and New York City, where her beauty and outlandish behavior demonstrated at the center of several avant-garde circles. The eccentric vocabulary and syntax of Loy’s free-verse poems and their sardonic treatment of love can puzzle and offend, but no reader can question the work’s originality nor the poet’s fierce intelligence.  In the top of the 20th Century when Jazz was born as a new American cultural art form Mina repleat with swagger, style, panache challenging the upper crust society in America and dropping and become part of the scene in New York City.  Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

Apology Of Genius

by Mina Loy

Ostracized as we are with God
The watchers of the civilized wastes
reverse their signals on our track

Lepers of the moon
all magically diseased
we come among you
innocent
of our luminous sores

unknowing
how perturbing lights
our spirit
on the passion of Man
until you turn on us your smooth fools’ faces
like buttocks bared in aboriginal mockeries

We are the sacerdotal clowns
who feed upon the wind and stars
and pulverous pastures of poverty

Our wills are formed
by curious disciplines
beyond your laws

You may give birth to us
or marry us
the chances of your flesh
are not our destiny –

The cuirass of the soul
still shines –
And we are unaware
if you confuse
such brief
corrosion with possession

In the raw caverns of the Increate
we forge the dusk of Chaos
to that imperious jewellery of the Universe
— the Beautiful –

While to your eyes
A delicate crop
of criminal mystic immortelles
stands to the censor’s scythe

 

Japanese translation for meaning

Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Jazz Riffshot ~ Improvisation ~ Awakening to The Life You Want…feat. University Of Toronto 10 O’clock Jazz Orchestra – “Awakening”

Reflections-of-a-Teaching-Artist-

 

“To live your dream, you’ve got to see something (dream) and be willing to act it out (action)  Acting out a dream is always the more difficult part since it requires a leap of faith without quite knowing exactly the way to go about achieving your desire.  It is easy to get discouraged and ultimately give up on your vision when you don’t know how to achieve it.”  Nadia Brown from Becoming:  The Life & Musings of a Girl Poet

 

A time comes in everyone’s life when you finally get it!  In the fog of Life that is colored by all of your fears and confusion you stop and listen to the still small voice inside your head that cries out…ENOUGH1 Enough fighting, crying, blaming, and most of all struggling to hold on to the past or future. You center yourself to a mindfulness meditation like a child quieting down after a tantrum holding back your tears or just let go you lean in and visualize the world through new eyes.

Charicature of Igor Stravinsky

Charicature of Igor Stravinsky

I am in the present. I cannot know what tomorrow will bring forth. I can know only what the truth is for me today. That is what I am called upon to serve, and I serve it in all lucidity.” ~ Igor Stravinsky

 

 

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You realize it’s time to stop hoping and waiting for something to change, or for happiness, safety and security to magically appear over the next horizon.

 

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You realize that in the real world fairy tales and movies have happy endings, and that there are no guarantees of “happily ever after”.  It has to begin with you…and living the process you feel  a     sense of serenity and acceptance.

 

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You realize that you are not perfect and that not everyone will always love, appreciate or approve of who or what you are… but that’s OK. They are entitled to their own opinions. (however wrong they may  be LOL)

 

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You realize the importance of loving and nurturing yourself…and in the process you have created a sense confidence that is rooted in self-approval.

 

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Your no longer complain and/or blame other people for the things they did or didn’t do to or for you –you realize that the only thing you can really count on is God’s grace and gifts you were born with,

 

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You realize that people don’t always say what they mean or mean what they say.  Not everyone will or can always be there for you  accepting the fact that it is not about You.

 

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You are able to stand on your own and can take care of yourself…and in the process you gain a sense of safety and security that makes you self-reliant and sufficient,

 

 

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You stop judging and begin to accept people as they are.  You realize that their shortcomings and human frailties are what God created in us freeing us so that we may gain a sense of peace and contentment that is a manifestation of forgiveness.

musical_note_clip_art_12518 You open up to new worlds, different points of view, and the tapestry of possibilities and wonder that life has to offer. You reassess and redefine who you are and what you really stand for letting go of those things that no longer serve you.

 

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You accept the difference between wanting and needing.  You discard the doctrines, values and thoughts that you’ve outgrown.

 

 

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You accept that there is power and dignity in creating and making contributions to make the world a better place.

 

 

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You understand that the principles of honesty and integrity are essence of what holds us together and the foundation upon which you must build your life.

 

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You don’t know everything and it’s not your responsibility to save the world.  The only cross  you have to bear is the one you choose to carry.

 

musical_note_clip_art_12518You realize what love is.  Relationships only thrive with mutual respect and caring and harmony. You understand that “alone”  does not mean lonely it means solitude.

 

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You realize that you cannot control people, situations or outcomes. You  distinguish between guilt and accountability and the value of setting boundaries and learning how to say NO.

 

musical_note_clip_art_12518Your body is really your temple. You must take care for it and treat it with respect. You eat a balanced diet, drinking more water, add walking meditation to your lifestyle.

 

 

musical_note_clip_art_12518You understand that being “tired” fuels doubt, fear, and confusion and treat yourself to rest.  Sustenance comes with the understanding that ‘food fuels the body’ ~ ‘laughter fuels the soul’ and ‘gratitude makes your life fuller and richer’. It is vital that you take more time to laugh and to play.

 

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You accept the fact that in order to achieve success you need direction, discipline and perseverance. You also understand sometimes you cannot do it alone, and when to take the chance to ask for help and support.

 

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You understanding that fear is not real and a tremendous drain on your energy.  You are now able to lean into your fears understanding that there is no wrong choice, you must make another this is what life is all about.  You are able to handle whatever comes before you because you are on the right wake.  “It is the not the destination that matters it is the journey.

 

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You fight for your beliefs and life and not waste it living under a cloud of confusion and despair.

 

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Most important principle in improvising your life is that life isn’t always fair, you don’t always get what you want and that sometimes bad things happen to all of us.

 

 

musical_note_clip_art_12518Negative emotions such as anger, envy and resentment must be redirected or you will disappear.

 

 

musical_note_clip_art_12518At the end of the day, you realize that you must have gratitude for your life and the simple comforts of shelter, food and a life you can create.  Instead of looking at what you don’t have you focus on the things you do have.

 

It is necessary for us to take responsibility for ourself by making a commitment to honor yourself and others never to settle for anything less than what your heart and soul desires.  Keep smiling, trusting, and to stay in mindful awareness allowing life to unfold into possibilities you never thought were possible.  This is what my mindfulness meditations have given me and what I learned from the jazz lessons I have included in my life improvising, experiencing, learning, accepting and waiting.  At the end of the day, with courage in you heart inhale your dreams and exhale those things that don’t allow them to become a reality.  July 30th is my birthday and I can honestly say that I have a love of life and are living the creative life that was only dreams when I was eleven years old.  How about you?  What have you learned?  I bet you will surprise yourself…. Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

 

rhythm primer rest

 

 

Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Poet’s Beat ~ Solo Finger Solo by Jayne Cortez feat. Count Basie & His Orchestra playing “Strike Up The Band”

 

Photo of Count BASIE and Buck CLAYTON

Photo of Count BASIE and Buck CLAYTON

 

This is an excerpt from the Memoir/Running Chapter Title:  “The 1968 Newport Jazz Festival

The sixties were the age of youth, as 70 million children from the post-war baby boom became teenagers and young adults.  It was considered a movement away from the conservative fifties resulting in “revolutionary ways of thinking” effectively creating a real change in the cultural fabric of American life.  No longer content to be a stain of the age of depression and cultural stagnation because young folks wanted change. The changes affected education, social mores and values, lifestyles, laws and social justice, and more importantly the entertainment.  American culture underwent a revolutionary change in ideas, creativity, diversity and lifestyles that are continuing to evolve today.

….It was early April 1968 when dad burst into our family room announcing that we are going to move back to New York City.  I am fourteen years old and I thought I was going to attend Hollywood High.  The wind was knocked out of my sails.  I even asked if I could stay in L.A. and dad looked at me as if I had lost my mind.  Shaking his head and smiling “I am responsible for getting the MJFO with Dizzy rehearsed and ready to perform at the Newport Jazz Festival in June.  Of course you are my lead assistant as you were for Monterey and the opening of the Los Angeles Music Center right, Jan?  I was on cloud 9.

We travelled with the musicians and families via Greyhound and we stayed by the shore.  I was an amazing experience to witness for me as a young girl being a part of our backstage and onstage story.  The musicians were so polite and oozed a familial warmth and deep respect for one another.  The rehearsals were intense and lasted for hours with breaks for lunch.  I saw the discipline these artists had and their pursuit of exploring their passion and dedication to perform jazz with utmost perfection. They were well traveled and welcomed the opportunity to share jazz with everyone.  Dad said that he was arranging and orchestrating with Count Basie and His Barons of Rhythm who were well known to audiences across the Midwest through radio broadcasts from Kansas City’s Reno Club.  Dad brought me to the stage and Count Basie was rehearsing his orchestra and was sitting at the piano, he turned and motioned for me to sit next to him on the bench.  I shot a look at Dad, “What are you waiting for?  I ran and jumped up onto the bench.  He played this song…  Thanks for letting me share this moment with you.  The poem by Jayne Cortez perfectly captures my experience!  Peace Out!  JBC8-)

 

 Solo Finger Solo

by Jayne Cortez

 

When evening goes down into its jelly jelly jelly

into drain pipe cuts and stitches and vaccijations

protruding from arms

 

And spirit of the five by five man pushes

his sweet potatoes in the air

feather daddy leaps into a falcon of tropical bird squats

rubber legs swing into off beat onijos onijos

then into your solo finger solo

the blues chantrees jumps up and

repeats her nasal volcanic chant calling

 

Count Basie     Count Basie     Count Basie

 

And Count Basie

you burn through this timbale of goose flesh rhythms

a drop of iodine on your starfish lips

the intonation of your kiss of melodic trilling

into a labyrinth of one o’clock jumps

into corpuscle flashes of the blues torpedo

the erupting volcano of the blues shouters chanting your name

 

Count Basie     Count Basie     take ‘em to Chicago Count Basie

 

And Count Basie

you punctuate this strong bourbon mist of gamma globulin breath

a mixture of chords like serpentariums coiling

from the deep everglades of your body

and when the luscious screams of three headed root doctors split

Kansas City reeds in unison with this triple tapping

double stopping   slow grinding    loosey butt night swinging

with the blues chantress

erupting volcano of the blues torpedoes chanting your name

 

Count Basie

you reach through the bottom of the music

way down beneath cross rhythm vamps

below air stream of the lowest octave

into depths of a sacred drum

and Count Basie     Count Basie     Count Basie     Count Basie

how powerful and dignified and exquisite and direct and sharp

your solo finger solo is

 

Courtesy of The Jazz Poetry Anthology Eds. Sasha Feinstein & Yusef Komynyakaa

©  1991 Indiana University Press  All rights reserved

 

Japanese translation for meaning

Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Poet’s Beat ~ “unfinished poem” by Carol Bergé accompanied by Kyle Eastwood’s “Summer Gone”

Modern-abstract-painted-porch-decoration-

Modern-abstract-painted-porch-decoration-

I have been hard at work writing the memoir.  When I begin to feel overwhelmed, I take a Mindful Awareness check to allow the fleeting negative self talk that rudely drops in the second I think I am swinging into full rhythm.   This can take a few minutes to a half an hour.  I get my sketch pad out and conjure up images that are flowing through my soul.  It has become a part of the process.  It is because I love writing more than my hating the blank page.  In high school when I was playing on the tennis team, I read a book by Timothy Gallway entitled Inner Tennis it changed my life.  It seems as though Jazz and mindful awareness also referred to as Mindfulness has moved my life away from entropy to a more “being” state with a smile inside/out.Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

 

 

unfinished poem

by Carol Bergé

 

to go out
to the world
this time dressed as a
japanese printmaker,
not the eye of
epicanthus, but
yes,
perspective
as that of an island:
out, out into a world,
to find it earth! and
more simple, complex
than it seemed:
reducible
to a few lines with
shadings, the wood
to its grain
rather than to the
external form.
what
part of earth are you!
and after that, to
go out,
perhaps dressed as a
haida shaman,
finding it
all ocean! and
strewn with cowry: lines
across sand.
once,
the land bridged.
let it
be an earth color:
orange of hematite or
dark as vital loam
where rivers are,
or blue
of roots from
the parched mesas,
saved
distillate of rain
toward one hand.
but always
as this rug:
woven
of wool from a real sheep,
alive, shorn with shears
and dyed
perhaps with berries
until brilliant, or
left so:
the soft natural.
but always
fashioned with
eyes, with hands,
as friends’ faces, worn or
young: with the
nature of it
evident,
brought
out.
Japanese translation for meaning

Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Excerpt from My Memoir: The Prologue (1st Draft)

healing spirit art creating circumstances

healing spirit art creating circumstances

It was Thursday, November 30th, 2000, a week after Thanksgiving.  It is a typical New York  City style event.  Sakes Fifth Avenue was ramping up piercing the veil of  festivities evoking spectacular window dressings that were dressed to the nines. The lighting of the Christmas tree at Rockefeller Center was set to be lit that evening to awaken and welcome the world to New York City ‘s Winter and Christmas’ Wonderland had arrived.  The Plaza was as beautifully bedazzled with lights  and folks in horse drawn carriages were riding through Central Park.

It was my last chance to make up for my loss and devastation resulting from my bilateral mastectomy.   Life, as I knew it six months before today, would be restored.  It meant to examine my tools and gifts to create what 1Peter with respect to creating a “spiritual house” which your tools will reveal your destiny.  10As each one has received a special gift, employ it in serving one another as good stewards of the manifold grace of God

Today, I am accepting and embracing everything that has happened in my life so far:  It began with  father’s death; my mom’s return of terminal cancer and continuing treatment; my diagnosis on April 14, 2000 (coincidentally on my father’s birthday); my bilateral mastectomy with all of it’s complications; my chemotherapy with all of its’ dreadful side effects; my loss of my job as a successful legal assistant for over 20 years; basically my whole life.  Today is my day; I get the chance to make things right with the world and my universe within.  I hoped that it was not just an illusion.

Counting, 100…99…95, I am breathing in life, I see my surgeon with her mask, her eyes were reassuring and smiling, I blink.  85…80 I open my eyes again halfway, I see my mom, beautifully 1960’s  coiffed light brown hair; almond shaped pools of peaceful hazel green eyes; skin so soft and radiant that has been paled by society’s proscriptions; a sweet smile that always masked the pain of living in two worlds, now standing by my side, smiling and leans over to kiss me on my cheek.  I hear the music of my father’s music that I gave the surgical team begin to play, “The Shadow of Your Smile”, it is filling the air, I am breathing and moving my soul– feeling every note.  75…70, I open my eyes again, I see my father, I can only see his face, I close my eyes tightly and slowly open them again, he is still there, he is smiling and leans over to kiss my forehead and says, “you are playing my music, I added the song I wrote for you when you were born, can you hear it?”  I feel myself nodding.  Darkness now has consumed me.

            The next time my eyes open I am in the ICU, I am connected to several machines, they are beeping.  Morphine drip is set on automatic.  I stir trying to find some comfort in being in a lot of pain and searching for relief.  I turn my head and open my eyes and I see Todd a friend from work is standing by my bed.  He said he sneaked in, my mom told him where I was.  We smiled and laughed.  Suddenly, an alarm went off—nurses and staff come running in.  I scream.  “What is going on?”  My mouth is covered with an oxygen mask.  My surgeon is now standing next to me,  says, “the graft failed, I have to take you back into the OR.”  I said “WAIT!  How long have I been in surgery?”  She answered, “16 hours.”  “What about my DNR?”  She said “your mom rescinded it.”  Suddenly my mother was beside the gurney as I was being wheeled to the OR that was awaiting me.  My mom motioned for them to stop the gurney, she positioned herself to be in front of me.  “I can’t mom, just let me go, ”  I cried.  She took my hand and said, “I need you, you have been my caregiver for the past 3 years and I still need you, I am your caregiver now and more importantly, it is not your time.

“Jannat” performed by Gilberto & His  Musicabana Orchestra

It meant that if God gives an assignment,  you also are given the skill.  So that meant to me to return to writing and art with all of my heart and it will reveal your wake or assignment.  That is when my journey became healed and was transformed.  My fears drifted into the darkness at the center of my soul.  I took a deep breath, closed my eyes, I exhaled, letting go of the most frightening and painful parts of my life and awaked to the allow grace to flow into my life.   I began to feel as though I was sailing into uncharted waters, completely trusting and hearing the song my father wrote for me having faith that my life’s purpose and plan would take care of itself.    This is my song and story…

“…I keep looking for one more teacher, only to find that fish learn from the water and birds learn from the sky.” (p.275)”   ― Mark NepoFacing the Lion, Being the Lion: Finding Inner Courage Where It Lives

What do you think?  I would love for you to take a few moment to share your thoughts and comments, JBC 8-)  Peace Out!

Japanese translation for meaning

Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

 

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Jazz Bytes ~ Happy 4th of July ~ Uno Cookbook Recipe for Rawsome Vegan Lasagna! Healthy Low-Fat Italian Pasta – Doin’ the Eazy Peazy Thing! Feat. Thelonious Monk – Nice Work If You Can Get It

Zucchini-lasagna-raw-vegan

Zucchini-lasagna-raw-vegan

 

Well I wanted to start things off before the big Bang hits.  This is a super nutritious and fresh raw vegan Lasagna .  Great picnic and BBQ dish.  Wishing you all peace, freedom, and most of loving kindness on the eve of Independence Day.  NOTE:  THE CREDIT   The original recipe is from my blog at http://www.unocookbook.com. Can you add the original link?  Thank you.  JBC

 

Whether you follow a vegan or a raw food diet, here is an easy raw vegan lasagna recipe, made with zucchini, basil pesto and macadamia cheese.

INFO BOX

 

Preparation time50 m

Recipe categoryFirst course

Recipe yield4

 

INGREDIENTS

Ingredients

For the basil pesto

For the tomato cream

For macadamia cheese

PREPARATION

For the macadamia cheese
Pour all ingredients in a blender and mix until a thick cream. Set aside.

For the tomato cream
Pour all ingredients into a blender and mix until creamy. Set aside.

For the basil pesto
Pour all ingredients into a blender and mix until creamy. Set aside.

Wash zucchini and cut them into very thin slices.

Make lasagna alternating a layer of zucchini, a layer of macadamia cheese, a layer of zucchini, a layer of tomato sauce, a layer of zucchini, a layer of basil pesto. Keep the lasagna in the fridge and serve decorated with fresh basil and pine nuts.

Bon Apétit!  JBC 8-)

Japanese translation for meaning

Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

 

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Poet’s Beat ~ “A Goodnight” by William Carlos Williams feat. James Moody performing “Night Flight”

Jazz- Miles-Davis-15-yuriy-shevchuk

Jazz- Miles-Davis-15-yuriy-shevchuk

 selected a sound that would best accompany William Carlos Williams  A Goodnight with James Moody “Night Flight” because it reminds me of the night that the Monterey Jazz Festival Orchestra was off on its European tour with Art, Blakey, Dizzy, the 25 other musicians  and their families kicking off a Bon Voyage Party set to take flight around midnight in October 1965.  The tempo/beat/rhythm is a perfect combo to drop into to the 4th  of July celebration.  Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

 

  

A Goodnight 

by William Carlos Williams

 

Go to sleep—though of course you will not—
to tideless waves thundering slantwise against
strong embankments, rattle and swish of spray
dashed thirty feet high, caught by the lake wind,
scattered and strewn broadcast in over the steady
car rails! Sleep, sleep! Gulls’ cries in a wind-gust
broken by the wind; calculating wings set above
the field of waves breaking.
Go to sleep to the lunge between foam-crests,
refuse churned in the recoil. Food! Food!
Offal! Offal! that holds them in the air, wave-white
for the one purpose, feather upon feather, the wild
chill in their eyes, the hoarseness in their voices—
sleep, sleep . . .
Gentlefooted crowds are treading out your lullaby.
Their arms nudge, they brush shoulders,
hitch this way then that, mass and surge at the crossings—
lullaby, lullaby! The wild-fowl police whistles,
the enraged roar of the traffic, machine shrieks:
it is all to put you to sleep,
to soften your limbs in relaxed postures,
and that your head slip sidewise, and your hair loosen
and fall over your eyes and over your mouth,
brushing your lips wistfully that you may dream,
sleep and dream—

A black fungus springs out about the lonely church doors—
sleep, sleep. The Night, coming down upon
the wet boulevard, would start you awake with his
message, to have in at your window. Pay no
heed to him. He storms at your sill with
cooings, with gesticulations, curses!
You will not let him in. He would keep you from sleeping.
He would have you sit under your desk lamp
brooding, pondering; he would have you
slide out the drawer, take up the ornamented dagger
and handle it. It is late, it is nineteen-nineteen—
go to sleep, his cries are a lullaby;
his jabbering is a sleep-well-my-baby; he is
a crackbrained messenger.

The maid waking you in the morning
when you are up and dressing,
the rustle of your clothes as you raise them—
it is the same tune.
At table the cold, greeninsh, split grapefruit, its juice
on the tongue, the clink of the spoon in
your coffee, the toast odors say it over and over.

The open street-door lets in the breath of
the morning wind from over the lake.
The bus coming to a halt grinds from its sullen brakes—
lullaby, lullaby. The crackle of a newspaper,
the movement of the troubled coat beside you—
sleep, sleep, sleep, sleep . . .
It is the sting of snow, the burning liquor of
the moonlight, the rush of rain in the gutters packed
with dead leaves: go to sleep, go to sleep.
And the night passes—and never passes—

 

Japanese translation for meaning

Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

 

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Jazz on Canvas ~ Under the Influence ~ In Pursuit of a Happy Ending

“Perhaps you are unaware of the fact that you are the customized expression of a loving God.  He has wired you through some genetic mechanism we do not yet understand.  You have been endowed with a unique mix of competencies and the drive to use them in pursuit of some outcome of unrivalled personal importance.  Your life has meaning built into it.  Effectively you have an exciting, challenging, achievable destiny if you will, but discover and embrace who you are destined to be.” ~  Arthur F. Miller

 

in-pursuit-of-happiness

in-pursuit-of-happiness

We all like to believe that we are autonomous beings, that our personalities belong to us and we are separate in mind and spirit from behaviors of others and their influence upon us. But in real time we live under the influence of everything and everyone around us. Dad always emphasized and drummed into us to “be your own person don’t follow others mindlessly, your purpose in life is unique to you and your friends may want to play, but follow your heart, it is the best navigator to following your North Star.  And at the time, I really didn’t get what he meant by it.

 

“Music is your own experience, your own thoughts, your wisdom. If you don’t live it, it won’t come out of your horn. They teach you there’s a boundary line to music. But, man, there’s no boundary line to art.” ~ Charlie Parker 

I was raised believing that in order to survive I had to live in disguise. When I was very young, the sanctity of my room is where I had hopes, dreams, values and aspirations.  When I left my room I had to leave them behind like my books and other treasures tucked away on a shelf nestled in the opposite corner of my bedroom.  I believe with all of my heart Dad loved me, but I caved and bartered my own thoughts and feeling when he told me what I was supposed to want.  I sacrificed what I really wanted because Dad tells me that being a doctor is where it’s at.  The early part of my journey amidst the jazz world I would hole up in my room discovering and accepting fully the gifts and talents that God gave me.  I would let go of my family “persona” to free my imagination tapping into my personal sense of purpose and who I really was.  Early mornings I would lie in bed hearing the music climb the stairs, it had a purpose, it had an intent – it was harmonic, it had a rhythm that grabbed my heart and rearrange the beats to prepare me to go to my desk open my curtains and let the burst of the morning gently touch my face.  Jazz was transformative.

I was paralyzed by the feeling of losing my father if I chose to follow my star.  I needed for him to tell me things would be okay.  That he would help me, encourage me, teach me the way things are in the world I was living in.  How did he do it?  Every time I tried to step out of the role he was creating for me, he would resist.  So I would withdraw and try to convince myself that he knows what’s best for me.  I was so conflicted when he would teach me how to sight sing music, take me to his rehearsals and ask what instrument I wanted to learn how to play.  There were definitely rules of conduct and engagement with others.  There were two distinct behaviors, one associated with our home and private life and the one associated with our public life.  I spent most of the time in my room.  There the only rule was to be myself.

Beautiful Pastel Pop of Color Painting

Beautiful Pastel Pop of Color Painting

Our outer selves are in constant flux.  Folks come into our lives and go.  We move from place to place.  We are creating and establishing in every living moment.  When taking a peek at our inner selves it always remains the same.  Our awareness is what changes because we are in touch with our true self.  It was inheriting breast cancer that caused me to embark on this journey.  That was the biggest game changer with respect to finding and identifying how jazz is part of my true nature.  When I think about all of the setbacks or side effects that are related to cancer I play dad’s album or listen to Eric Dolphy’s Out to Lunch or Coltrane or Miles or Seattle Women’s Jazz Orchestra I am reminded of being in my room laying on my bed as a child.  Now if I am not in balance with my  true self, I stop, crank up the sounds, put on the cool shades and dance around building up the energy to write because I am re-aligned and grateful for the smallest things, like the sun, moon stars, and of course, the life thing.  Some folks say that we were not born with an instruction manual.  Parents are guiding us, but, now I know I am going to set sail to follow my North Star.

Somehow, I made it through the tumultuous 60’s cultural and civil rights revolutions.  I believed that suffered greatly from it, emotionally and physically which made it conducive for Cancer to enter and uproot my life. Worst of all, i lost my rents.  For all intents and purposes, those years and awful experiences could have irreparably broken me.  However, the jazz lessons I learned healed and transformed me guiding me to the other side a better person for it all.  Rather than becoming a broken, bitter and mistrustful person, I found a compassion and tenderness within me I never knew existed.  I found optimism and joy in the little things, the ability to laugh and find humor in just about anything.  And through that, I also discovered the will and ability to start my life over, to go back to school and learn a new vocation helping others find comfort from their own woes.

The secret habits of Jazz living allows us to coexist with folks around us and the situations in which we find ourselves immersed, we have the power to choose a mutually beneficial and filled with compassion and understanding of one another.  The true blessing is that we can take our adversities, learn from them, and transform them to effect a positive outcome not just for ourselves, but for those around us.  So let’s get to it, pack your bags, get your shades on ‘cause we are gonna set sail and discover that jazz is transformative in everyday life.  It’s all about awareness…How about you, do you remember a turning point in your life?  Peace out!  JBC 8-)

Japanese translation for meaning

Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

 

 

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The Challenge of Writing a Stellar Book Proposal by JBC

One of the major attributes to writing a successful book proposal is listening and reading suggestions that will serve as catalyst which is the key to understanding the entire process.  I feel that carefully reading navigator1965’s posts and following through with How To Write A Book Proposal by Joanna Penn template you would produce a deeper understanding of marketing and as folks frequently say “reality”.  When I find something that rings true I want to share it.  So here we go…

Joanna Penn in a post about writing a proposal addresses the climate change of going traditional vs self publishing.  Despite the changes in the publishing industry, many people still want to pursue a traditional publishing deal. Maybe you’re one of them.

The book proposal is the scary monster that must be faced if you are pitching agents and publishers. It is in some ways harder than your book to write. How on earth can you distil your months/years of hard work down into a catchy proposal that hooks you the deal you want?

Penn recently bought ‘Writing a winning fiction book proposal: An insider’s secrets to landing an agent and a book contract” by Michael Hyatt and wanted to share some key points from the ebook.

4 key points on writing your book proposal by Michael Hyatt

  • Agents and publishers do not want to see your manuscript (unless they ask for it). They need to be hooked on your project within seconds or you will go into the trash pile. The proposal is your chance to impress and it must include certain elements. In a way, it’s not that hard because the questions are often the same. So there is a kind of formula, you just need to know what it is. The proposal will also give you a chance to think critically about your own book. If you can’t distill your book down into these important elements, then maybe there is something you need to fix?
  • You need to know the genre your book fits into. Your book won’t be interesting or relevant to everyone in the world. You need to understand the niche you fit into and where your book would go in a bookshop. This is also critical before you even pitch because agents specialize in certain genres. You can’t pitch a sci-fi book to a romance agent, or horror to someone specializing in literary fiction. That’s wasting everyone’s time. You should be researching agents first. Many of them have blogs now so you can find out more on what they like and represent. Also, don’t make a genre up. Do your research on where your book fits. You can also mention what other books your book is like. I always say Pentecost is like Dan Brown meets Lara Croft. It gives you an instant idea of what the book is like.
  • Write your hook in 9 sentences or less. There is a full breakdown in the ebook as to how you can do that but understanding that you need to get it down to basically a paragraph is key. It means writing and rewriting, breaking it down to the most important elements until you have a coherent, irresistible hook. Writing your own back blurb is a similar process.
  • The synopsis is a breakdown of the plot from beginning to end. Don’t say “read the book to find out the story”. They don’t have time! It has to be short and to the point, but also complete with all the plot points. It demonstrates your book is a complete story and has enough in it to justify looking further. It will also demonstrate your own writing ability.

 

The Overview Draft

If you were to put  bestsellers  filled  with ingredients  like jazz arts and sustainability in MOVING TO HIGHER GROUND; civil rights riots, insuperable chauvinism and searching for racial identification in  THE COLOR OF WATER:  A BLACK MAN’S TRIBUTE TO HIS WHITE MOTHER; or have a consciousness raising of living the life you want as portrayed in CATASTOPHE LIVING plus add a dash of TRAVELING  POMAGRANTES a touching Mother-Daughter story  about life after the diagnosis, surgery and chemo and /or radiation treatment you would be reading Saved By Jazz: The Healing and Transformational Powers of Melodies.

Saved by Jazz is a memoir set in Seattle, New York, Los Angeles and Monterey, California during the 1960’s Jazz scene.  It captures the intensified racial unrest of the Watts riots and the stifling barriers of chauvinism in Jazz. This coming-of-age story of loss, survival and betrayal tells the story of a mixed race girl who grows up with a renowned jazz composer-father and her courageous fight against breast cancer and death  using the gift her father taught using jazz life to heal and transform through mindfulness meditations to realize the life she dreamed of and leaning into a creative life in the Pacific Northwest.   Saved by Jazz is a companion to Fifty Shades of Jazz blog about finding jazz in everyday life.  How the powers of jazz in literary & visual arts healed and transformed living with breast cancer and loss of both parents.  It is filled with mindfulness meditations, literary, visual and acoustic snapshots that demonstrate  the universality Jazz an American art form Living, My Story ~ Life challenges of GBS & BrCa and Improvising to Live your Dream Life using mindfulness meditation and secret habits of Jazz living.  Please note the narratives in this work sample by listening to the songs on my father’s CD:   Dizzy Gillespie & James Moody with Gil Fuller & the Monterey Jazz Festival Orchestra by Dizzy Gillespie

Saved by Jazz is meant to awaken, transform and heal individuals and communities thru Jazz in the 60’s functioned as a communal bond, ritual and form of social interaction.  It became more than just sounds to me.  It is a way of living in the world today.  Jazz has never been just about music for me.  I realized that I wanted to be the song that embraced and caressed the space.  Jazz is the touchstone of modern cultural imagination, archiving mythical images as well as an aesthetic paradigm creating new modes of writing, listening, seeing and moving.  I want to awaken It is my desire to use the jazz improvisational elements I have experienced and learned that have emerged into literary forms – narrative, poems and pastiches that will be included in this memoir.

It is the true story of the author’s year of musical thinking; the challenge and struggle of mother-daughter fight to live with breast cancer, and her mindfulness meditation  journey of discovery and understanding. When the author was growing up, her father taught her the meaning and metaphor of jazz and living a charmed and wonderful creative life.  She didn’t really appreciate that gift until three years after his death and the return of breast cancer in her mother. Her spiritual journey combined with mindfulness meditation provided a deeper understanding of taking the opportunity and courage to leave through this breast cancer ordeal to want to share with others.

Running Title:  Saved by Jazz:  The Healing and Transformative Powers of MelodiesT

his memoir  will be written in Sections or Choruses:

With a Prelude and A Grace Note to the author’s father will.

- Chorus  One will chronicle the author’s life of growing up in LA and The Year of Living Musically.
– Chorus  Two will describe how the author and her mother take on Breast Cancer.
– Chorus Three will demonstrate how living a jazz infused mindfulness meditations to Improvising your dream into reality and being in the present tense.

In the CODA putting things all together to create a sense of serenity and transformation because of a change of life’s perspective leads to the Aha! Moments of  living the life that you create filled with  peace based upon better understanding and acceptance.

The book will be approximately 50,000  to 75,000 words. The manuscript’s projected completion will be  twelve months after receipt of the advance.

Okay, It took me a number of days to read, write and form the objective.  What do you think?  Any thoughts or elements that stand out to you?  I would love to hear from you….Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

Japanese translation for meaning

Copyright 2011-2014  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Overview of my Memoir Proposal By Jazzybeatchick

 

Warhol - count-basie

Warhol – count-basie

“It’s the way you play that makes it . . . Play like you play. Play like you think, and then you got it, if you’re going to get it. And whatever you get, that’s you, so that’s your story.” ~  Count Basie

I want to awaken listeners around the world to the powers of jazz and literary arts that will heal and transform individuals and communities.   When I started the last leg of I write about all things I am passionate about in the present tense.  I am living the dream in the Pacific Northwest, so I write a lot about that, too. I have always wanted the kind of blog that appeals to folks from all walks of life that will swing by my blog and will be entertained, enriched and most of all enjoy themselves.  It is my belief that listeners who embrace jazz have curiosities of  other aspects of life that are diversified and go  above and beyond jazz, respectively. Music is an essential part of this blog.  It is filled with literary arts, entertainment, knowledge, spirituality, memories, cuisine, philosophy, social commentary, music, wellness and various other thought-evoking topics.   I am living with Breast Cancer and write about mindfulness meditation, Jazz lessons on life and memories that have healed and transformed my life.  It’s all about Jazz, Life, Cancer and Love from the Pacific Northwest….

 

A well told story—is that it has the appearance of being easy, effortless. A great story feels as if the writer has crawled inside of your head, pulled up an easy chair, and whispered the written words into your ear. That magic seduces all of us. And like the precocious child at a birthday party, we want the magicians to tell us their tricks.

 

This brings me back to the art of the narrative nonfiction proposal…

 

The advice I offer is not in the realm of trickery.  There really are no tricks to fine writing.  I credit Navigator 1965 that shed light on the narrative non- fiction proposal.  I have discovered it’s trial and error. Lots of error, just like playing the piano, cooking, or throwing a slider. But there are pieces of sheet music, books of recipes, and diagrammed finger positions to ground and guide the dedicated. I’ll try and present the equivalent to the aspiring nonfiction storyteller.

 

A great proposal is about structure and voice.  How can a writer structure a proposal so that they can dynamically “show” what he or she wants to create as well as entertainingly “tell” his target reader how he plans to do it?

 

The real skill is in being able to non-judgmentally notice when your brain is wandering and refocus yourself back on the present moment.

 

One Seattle writer solved and gave me inspiration for my memoir this way:

 

One of the few advantages of dying from Grade 3, Stage IIIC endometrial cancer, recurrent and metastasized to the liver and abdomen, is that you have time to write your own obituary. (The other advantages are no longer bothering with sunscreen and no longer worrying about your cholesterol.) To wit:

I was born in Seattle on August 10, 1952, at Northgate Hospital (since torn down) at Northgate Mall. Grew up in Shoreline, attended Shorecrest High, graduated from the University of Washington in 1975 with a Bachelor of Arts in History. Aside from eight memorable months lived in New York City when I was nineteen (and where I worked happily and insouciantly on the telephone order board for B. Altman & Co.), I was a lifelong Seattle resident.

 

In my professional life, I was a freelance writer, editor, and proofreader. Among career honors, I received a First Place Society of Professional Journalists award for Humorous Writing for my column Jane Explains, which ran from 1999-2005 in the Jet City Maven, later called The Seattle Sun. Also won First Place in the Mainstream Novel category of the 2009 Pacific Northwest Writers Association Literary Contest for my comic novel, The Bette Davis Club (available at Amazon.com). I would demonstrate my keen sense of humor by telling a few jokes here, but the Times charges for these listings by the column inch and we must move on.

 

Many thanks to Sylvia Farias, MSW, at Swedish Cancer Institute for encouraging me to be part of an incredibly wise gynecological cancer support group. Thanks as well to the kind-hearted nurses and doctors at Group Health Capitol Hill oncology. And thanks to my sister Barbara who left no stone unturned in helping me get life-extending treatment in my final months.

 

I also want to thank Mrs. Senour, my first grade teacher, for teaching me to read. I loved witty conversation, long walks, and good books. Among my favorite authors were Iris Murdoch (particularly The Sea, The Sea) and Charles Dickens.

 

I was preceded in death by my generous and loving parents, Michael Gallagher Lotter and Margaret Anne Lotter (nee Robertson), and by my dear younger sister, Julie Marie Lotter. I am survived by my beloved husband, Robert (“Bob”) Lee Marts, and our two adult children: daughter, Tessa Jane Marts, and son, Riley William Marts. Also my dear sisters Barbara Lotter Azzato, Kathleen Nora Lahti, and Patricia Anne Crisp (husband Adrian). And many much-loved nieces and nephews, in-laws, and friends.

 

I met Bob Marts at the Central Tavern in Pioneer Square on November 22, 1975, which was the luckiest night of my life. We were married on April 7, 1984. Bobby M, I love you up to the sky. Thank you for all the laughter and the love, and for standing by me at the end. Tessa and Riley, I love you so much, and I’m so proud of you. I wish you such good things. May you, every day, connect with the brilliancy of your own spirit. And may you always remember that obstacles in the path are not obstacles, they ARE the path.

 

I believe we are each of us connected to every person and everything on this Earth, that we are in fact one divine organism having an infinite spiritual existence. Of course, we may not always comprehend that. And really, that’s a discussion for another time. So let’s cut to the chase:

 

I was given the gift of life, and now I have to give it back. This is hard. But I was a lucky woman, who led a lucky existence, and for this I am grateful. I first got sick in January 2010. When the cancer recurred last year and was terminal, I decided to be joyful about having had a full life, rather than sad about having to die. Amazingly, this outlook worked for me. (Well, you know, most of the time.) Meditation and the study of Buddhist philosophy also helped me accept what I could not change. At any rate, I am at peace. And on that upbeat note, I take my mortal leave of this rollicking, revolving world-this sun, that moon, that walk around Green Lake, that stroll through the Pike Place Market, the memory of a child’s hand in mine.

 

My beloved Bob, Tessa, and Riley. My beloved friends and family. How precious you all have been to me. Knowing and loving each one of you was the success story of my life. Metaphorically speaking, we will meet again, joyfully, on the other side.

 

Beautiful day, happy to have been here.

 

XOXO, Jane/Mom

Lotter’s husband Bob Marts created pins to share at her memorial service on Sunday inspired by her final words, reading “Beautiful day, happy to be here,” according to the New York Times.

Lotter inspired not only her family and friends, but an audience of millions over the Internet with what Marts describes as her love of life.

As one commenter wrote in Lotter’s online Guest Book, “If more of us had your outlook on life, this world would be a much better place.”

The goal is to work your way up. Admittedly, it is extremely difficult to just “be mindful” for every sing waking moment. When I learned mindfulness, dad and the musicians taught to do it in increments baby steps for just a few seconds of mindfulness at a time, working my way up to five, then 10 minutes. It is really tough to do and is almost like a mental muscle that needs to get strengthened over time. When it comes to sleep, being mindful can help us from getting stuck on rumination in bed, quiet our minds and bring about relaxation… and eventually sleep.  The real skill is in being able to non-judgmentally notice when your brain is wandering and refocus yourself back on the present moment.  Love to hear from you.  Take Care, Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

TO BE CONTINUED …  to the Prologue…

Japanese translation for meaning

 

Copyright 2011-2014 by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Poet’s Beat ~ “Dusk” Written by DuBose Heyward Feat. Schawkie Roth – “Dark Healing”

Courtesy of Fine Art Prints·... purple modern sunset paintings purple contemporary sunset paintings

Courtesy of Fine Art Prints·… purple modern sunset paintings purple contemporary sunset paintings

I am in the present. I cannot know what tomorrow will bring forth. I can know only what the truth is for me today. That is what I am called upon to serve, and I serve it in all lucidity.

~ Igor Stravinsky

 

I hope that you all had a wonderful weekend.  I was looking through my classic jazz productions and came across a wonderful memory of the San Francisco Opera of Porgy & Bess.  DuBose Heyward is an extraordinary poet.  I thought this poem was a beautiful reflection that I love to start my day and somehow staying present I am more receptive to wellness, and ready to lean into life’s mystery.  I am working on my memoir proposal and finishing the first draft.  Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

 

Dusk

by DuBose Heyward

They tell me she is beautiful, my City,
That she is colorful and quaint, alone
Among the cities. But I, I who have known
Her tenderness, her courage, and her pity,
Have felt her forces mould me, mind and bone,
Life after life, up from her first beginning.
How can I think of her in wood and stone!
To others she has given of her beauty,
Her gardens, and her dim, old, faded ways,
Her laughter, and her happy, drifting hours,
Glad, spendthrift April, squandering her flowers,
The sharp, still wonder of her Autumn days;
Her chimes that shimmer from St. Michael‘s steeple
Across the deep maturity of June,
Like sunlight slanting over open water
Under a high, blue, listless afternoon.
But when the dusk is deep upon the harbor,
She finds _me_ where her rivers meet and speak,
And while the constellations ride the silence
High overhead, her cheek is on _my_ cheek.
I know her in the thrill behind the dark
When sleep brims all her silent thoroughfares.
She is the glamor in the quiet park
That kindles simple things like grass and trees.
Wistful and wanton as her sea-born airs,
Bringer of dim, rich, age-old memories.
Out on the gloom-deep water, when the nights
Are choked with fog, and perilous, and blind,
She is the faith that tends the calling lights.
Hers is the stifled voice of harbor bells
Muffled and broken by the mist and wind.
Hers are the eyes through which I look on life
And find it brave and splendid. And the stir
Of hidden music shaping all my songs,
And these my songs, my all, belong to her.

© DuBose Heyward. All rights reserved

Japanese translation for meaning

Copyright  by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

 

 

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Jazz Bytes ~ Raw Lentil Tacos by Nouveau Raw featuring Horace Silver “Song For My Father” (Rudy Van Gelder Edition) [1999 - Remastered]

Creative Commons Atribute Sharp via Flickr

Creative Commons Atribute Sharp via Flickr

Nouveau Raw online is a wonderful site that compliments and nourishes my life.  It seems as though leaning into my life and living with the only truth I know today leave room for improvisation.  That is whether I plan things and God allows life to happen, I am present in both worlds.  Cancer changed my life in so many ways.  When it was happening I thought it was some sort of punishment or cruel joke.  Now I realize that it was yet another lesson that my life can use as a catalyst to transform my life for the better.  Ladies and Gentlemen, that is what my father gave me.  I started cooking when I was eight years old and by the time I was sixteen, he gladly passed the cooking to me.  I remember particularly on Father’s Day he and my brother would come to the table with the napkin tucked into their shirts ala cartoon characters and the folk and knife in each hand asking…”Where are we going tonight”… So I bring to you and your palette’s via Raw Food Alchemy by Amie Sue.  Have a wonderful weekend…til the next post, Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

 

I believe that every dish of food we plate, should be as nutrient packed as it is tasty.  Raw Lentil Tacos serves up both requirements.  I used sprouted lentils which are exploding with wonderful health benefits  such as; abundant source of protein, excellent source of dietary soluble fiber, and they are alkaline-forming in the body.

Sunflower seeds provide mono-unsaturatedoleic acid which helps to lower the “bad cholesterol” and increases the “good-cholesterol” in the blood.  Sunflower seeds along with the portobello mushrooms are packed with calcium, iron, manganese, zinc, magnesium, selenium, and copper.

Adding in all the wonderful fresh veggies, then tie it all together with the warming fiesta flavors of the taco seasoning…. and well shoot, these tacos make for a wonderful meal that is packed full of nutrients and flavor.
Lentil-Tacos-nut-free123

For taco shells, I turned to simplicity… butter leaf lettuce.  You do have options though.  If you want something a bit more fancy, try my Sun-dried Tomato Corn Wraps .    I also have a few other sides that would pair wonderfully with these Lentil Tacos such as; Chili Corn CrackersNacho Chili “Cheese”Corn ChipsRefried Beans (unfried-beanless-recipe), or if you don’t want to make the taco “meat” from lentils, you can make my other taco “meat” recipe that uses walnuts.   So many wonderful options.

Ingredients:

Taco lentil “meat”: yields 2 cups

Taco sauce:

Taco fillings:

Preparation:

Lentil “meat”:

  1. Sprout the lentils to enhance their nutritional value.
  2. Place the sunflower seeds in the food processor, fitted with the “S” blade, and pulse a few times to break them down just a bit.
  3. Wash and dry the mushrooms.  Remove the stems and discard.  Place the mushrooms and lentils in the food processor and pulse about 4 times to break them down.
  4. Add the onion and taco seasoning.  Pulse everything together.  Be careful not to over process and turn it into a mash.
  5. Heating option ~  place the lentil “meat” into a wide-mouthed container that fits inside of the dehydrator.  Warm at 115 degrees until it reaches the desired warmth.   The “meat” will darken in bit in time, this is normal and just fine.
  6. Store in the fridge up to 3 days.

Taco sauce:

  1. Follow the directions and then place the sauce in a squeeze bottle.  This is a wonderful way to drizzle it on the tacos.

Taco fillings:

  1. Slice everything into strips.
  2. Select all the large pieces of butter leaf lettuce to use as taco shells, build the taco with layers of goodness and enjoy!
  3. I used my taco shell mold as a taco holder for dinner.  It was so perfect!  Each slot held two tacos, so I was able to load up 6 tacos and serve them.

 

Lentil-Tacos-nut-free123

Here’s to an easy peazy Father’s Day!  YOLO Have an awesome weekend.  Bon Apetit!

 

Japanese translation for meaning

Copyright © 2011-2014 by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Jazz on Canvas ~ Awakening to Bring About the Life Within

Courtesy of Sergio Luzzi "Eruzione"

Courtesy of Sergio Luzzi “Eruzione”

 

 

There is in souls a sympathy with sounds:
And as the mind is pitch’d the ear is pleased
With melting airs, or martial, brisk or grave;
Some chord in unison with what we hear
Is touch’d within us, and the heart replies.
~William Cowper

 

June always reminds me of renewal, remembering, and rebirth.  Like the seasons in our life, when you truly awaken to your life you allow yourself to rediscover the magic of the life within.  This video is a wonderful way of awakening to the new life that is aching to get out!  Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

 

 

Copyright © 2011 – 2014 by Jannat Marie Jazzybeatchick. All rights reserved.

 

This material is has been copyrighted,  feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks and added to websites; please do not change for reading the content, provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name @ http://jazzybeatchick.com and your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

 

 

 

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Grace Notes For My Father

Happy Father’s Day!  I wrote this poem to honor and tribute the first man I ever loved.  He was complicated, dedicated and brimmed with tough love.  I now understand that it was a blessing in disguise.  I have always been a poet and artist at heart.  I thought he didn’t want me to go into a creative life.  Now when looking back I realize that if writing and being an artist meant that I was willing to devote my life to it completely and especially when it came to facing the hour of the wolf I would not to succumb to giving up but to surrender and face the harsh reality that it is my soul’s purpose and must push on past it no matter what….What about you?  Is there someone special in your life that made such an impact?  I have included my favorite song besides the one he wrote for me is The Shadow of Your Smile performed by Dizzy Gillespie and the Monterey Jazz Festival in 1965 in my memoir.  Although Dizzy and Lorraine didn’t have any children, he considered all young people as his Love Children…Best wishes, have a great day!  Peace and Love  JBC 8-)

 

Image of trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie with drumme...

Image of trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie with drummer Bill Stewart at 1984 Stanford Jazz Workshop. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Jazz Palette by Jannat Marie

Jazz Palette by Jannat Marie

Dear Dad,

Thank you for the lessons on life in 1965 where you created a phenomenal year of Jazz from  the Monterey Jazz Festival to the Grand Opening of the Music Center in L.A.  Thank you for the song you wrote for me…when I was three years old.  

I.

I learned that timing is critical in jazz as in life,

Knowing when to stop, start, step it up, slow it down

and more so important is learning how to wait thru the strife.

Jazz harmony a theory and practice of changing dominant and tonic chords,

where major and minor share the same syncopated space in a timeless bond…

Progressions depart in thirds and stacked fourths

favoring harmonic progressions where tensions are in intervals of 9ths, 11ths, or 13ths abound.

II.

I learned that the search for meaning, intentions and having the blues

is about finding your truth and appreciating a life of humility

‘cause the universe is misting the air with valuable truths

Living in the essence of a universal tranquility.

where cadance and notes are window dressing, a façade creates

by listening to the spoken word filled with harmonic intent

of the path and choices you debate.

Play it slant is the message best heard in the evening.

III.

I learned that being different is the integral part of the master plan

pressing forward seeing how far you can reach

harmonies in real-time, flowing and ebbing broadening the span

of improvisational context is what matters in all you teach.

IV.

I learned that playing jazz has four elements

broadening your words and expressing every letter

in a charismatic way to enhance

finding your intentions and mixing all them together.

where freedom and coordination learn how to really dance.

V.

Jazz has the power to go deep within,

having a relationship with you as next of kin

Surpassing arrogance into a love of the sound of spoken words

sharing that experience with others is where you begin.

VI,

I learned that I was saved by jazz

healing my soul and my body from within

thru life’s trials and tribulations to

finding peace on earth that is filled with

the promise of words and life dancing with joyous jubilation!

A Love so Supreme….Your Daughter

 

Japanese translation for meaning

©2013 Jazzybeatchick  All Rights Reserved.

Copyright © 2013 by Jazzybeatchick. All rights reserved.

This material has been copyrighted,  feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and, provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name @ http://jazzybeatchick.com and your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Jazz Bytes ~ Rawsome Chop Suey with Cauliflower Rice accompahied by Art Farmer’s Cool Breeze

Happy Friday all!  I know it has been awhile since I posted a recipe.

Summer is and will always be my favorite season of the year!  Not because my b’day is July, but indeed the most memorable year, it was the summer of 1965.  Looking forward to the Monterey Jazz Festival, Opening of the Los Angeles Music Center and of course the Newport Jazz Festival  where the view of the waves and surfers were so real you could feel the spray of water as the surf approached the shore.  I found this recipe that is a wonderful delight with notes of Cool Breeze by Art Farmer that not only conjures up the jazz during the 60’s but the light and citrus scented notes that are refreshing and a breeze to make.  Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:  Serves 2-4 of your most treasured guests –

 

Chop Suey 

4 heads baby bok choy sliced thinly

1/2 a head red cabbage, grated in the food processor

5 medium carrots, grated in the food processor
3 red peppers, sliced in the food processor
1 bunch celery, sliced in the food processor
1/2 to one head broccoli, sliced in the food processor
one package bean sprouts of your liking
one package shitake mushrooms, de-stemmed and sliced
Mix everything in a really big bowl.

Dressing::
5 smallish oranges, peeled and thrown in whole
1 lemon, peeled
1-1 1/2 cups raisins
1 clove garlic
1-2 Tablespoons Ume Plum Vinegar or to taste
Blend all dressing ingredients in the Vitamix and pour over salad.
Mix well and for even better taste, let it marinate for a couple of hours Enjoy!

Cauliflower rice
2 heads cauliflower, processed in the food processor with the S blade
1 head broccoli, same as cauliflower
1 bag frozen peas
1/2 bag frozen corn
2 red peppers, diced
Mix all above ingredients in a giant bowl and season with Ume Plum Vinegar to taste. Yum! Add diced avocado for even more deliciousness.

Bon Appétit!

Japanese translation for meaning

Copyright © 2011-2014 by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted,  feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and, provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name @ http://jazzybeatchick.com and your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Poet’s Beat ~ Nothing but Trouble by Richard Jackson feat. Charlie Parker’s All the Things You Are

Courtesy of  Creative Commons Abstract_expressionist_contemporary_painting

Courtesy of Creative Commons Abstract_expressionist_contemporary_painting

The Puget Sound Race for the Cure went off with out a hitch yesterday.  It marks my 11th year as a Volunteer and living with the vestiges of the consequences of breast cancer.  I am grateful now of this disease that has taken my mom and women around the world from this moment.  Today is seems that the pairing of Bird’s “All the Things You Are and Richard Jackson’s “Nothing but Trouble” places me into a playful mood or mindfulness that allows me to see the lovely acousticand visual portraits that are capable of bringing a smile and a tear in the same moment.  Have a wonderful day,  Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

 

Nothing but Trouble
………….The nothing that is not, and the nothing that is.
…………………………………-Stevens

So there was Alexander Graham Bell hanging around the back
of my mind. Some short circuit or another had confused him
with a barn owl, the barn owl with a dove, and the dove
with a blue heron. Just when you think nothing is there
it appears like an unseen planet you know only by the way
its sun wobbles. But why did he suddenly appear here
in the cavernous Basilica di San Francesco at Arezzo? Like us
with all the space between our atoms, or all that space between
planets, it is mostly nothing. At the far altar is the famous fresco
of Adam dying. Bell wanted to invent a machine to talk to
the dead. That’s why he seemed so blue. We could say he’s like
this or like that, but “like” really only tells more of what he is not.
Scientists tell us you can only see the real world by not looking
at it. When you look you change it. Is that why Terri’s picture
of the Moose came out blank? It seems like more trouble
to see things than to imagine them, so I’ll go on here. Five year old
Emily says there is a little world inside each flower. Some
Begonia petals are called Angel Wings. Her sister,
Anna, reads messages from her dead friend in vapor trails.
When we arrived at the town buried beneath the dam’s waters
there was nothing but what we could imagine, and that was enough.
It’s hard to call anything what it is. Ezekial ate God‘s scroll
to learn his words. Most of the wall frescoes here have been
painted over because it was too much trouble to keep them up.
Sometimes you can catch the faintest outline of one before
it dissolves like a cloud. There’s no secret that is secret.
The glowing clouds in each galaxy will soon broadcast
what laws have formed them. Terri says the bottoms
of cumulous clouds are flat because that’s the way children
draw them. The void doesn’t care what laws we have for it.
Sometimes she fingers through the abandoned lives left hanging
on the clothes rack at the second hand store. When you see them
fluttering in the rafters above the altar you could believe the soul
lives in the doves’ coo. The trouble is they are trying to get rid
of them. Nothing but trouble the Sexton mumbles over the rattle
of his key chain. My friend Amy says she avoids trouble by
becoming invisible. Sometimes we’re just a scale in need of a weight.
Trouble is when you think you are invisible and you are just trouble.
Meteors are invisible until the burn up in the atmosphere.
It’s what kills things that makes them visible. Levinas says
that we are involved in everyone’s death. That means the nameless
juvenile killed in the drive by on 36th street, and the girl gutted
for attending school in Afghanistan. Flocks of souls rise form
the desert like a mirage. The tongues of the silent sit like coffins.
They say nothing of the acid thrown in the girls’ faces, nothing
about what God might mean. They are no Ezekials. Nor are we.
But what was Alexander Bell supposed to mean in all this?
That the only worlds that endure are what we invent?
He wanted to build a clock for a time beyond our own.
Its beds are empty. Its rivers run dry. Oars with no boats.
One thing begins to cancel out another until nothing is left.
There are such abandoned places inside me, I don’t know.
Spinoza said the soul is just the body’s idea of itself.
He thought God was a precise but invisible clock.
This isn’t getting me anyplace. Maybe I should have
ignored Bell and started with the heron. I saw a perfect
white one fly over the Thai restaurant the other night.
There are too many ideas flickering here like those votive
candles trying to fill the hollow spaces of the church.
Some of them flicker then turn into invisible daylight stars.
In the beginning the universe was nothing but a quantum see saw.
In some Churches the candles are electric which takes us
back to Alexander Bell. I have to find a way for him to leave.
All of our light is borrowed from somewhere that’s
no longer where it was, the galaxies, the sun, our own
solar system all running away from each other
and leaving a kind of vacuum we’ll never fill.
No wonder the figures in our dreams always disguise
who they really are. There’s hardly anyone in this church
except the woman mourning at the side altar for her
dying husband. What do we call the space we leave behind?
Aeneas grasped the empty air he thought was his mother.
Is that why we feel a presence when there’s nothing there?
Leonardo’s lost Battle of Anghiari probably lies hidden
behind Vasari‘s great painting in the city hall of Florence.
Or it may not. X-Rays will tell us. But when you take away
anything there is still the space it occupied. It’s nothing.
No one except Goya knew how to show war’s real horrors
like his man impaled on a scrub oak tree, something
like what they’ve done in Bosnia. Or to Neda Agha Soltan
pictured shot and dying on a Tehran street by a cell phone
Bell once imagined as his visible speech machine.
If only we could be invisible to the shadows holding guns.
We never know how many beats are left in our hearts.
Still, if you do nothing you might as well be invisible.
Nothing lasts forever. The clocks are frowning. The soul
sounds hoarse. A farmer plows up a decades-old bomb.
There are baby stars being born in the empty space
of the universe. When they die they turn into diamonds.
No one knows why one of the stars in Orion is shrinking.
Most of what I’ve mentioned here came from text messages.
The tourists phones glow like tiny halos over their words.
We’ve begun to decipher radio waves from the big bang.
Is it true that we came from nothing? that those figures
in the backs of our minds are nothing but short circuits
or like the names worn off of old tombstones? like these
shattered frescoes searching for their originals? What
about you who I’ve kept hidden here all this time? Sometimes
we leave our feelings in the mirror for the next person
to put on. Our promises leave without closing the door.
They wander troubled among our dying neurons. That’s why
we can hear the heart’s despair in that little ringing in
our ears. Maybe the soul is a player piano we pretend to play.
In the altar fresco Moses is saying his last words to everyone
he’s loved. For a moment he seems to want to reach for
whatever last vision walks in shadow across his brain.
I can hear the Sexton starting to close the doors.
I think each of these sentences can fit into their own twitter.
How far have the light photons around us traveled?
The lines from here to there are all down. The man outside is
selling postcards from the Rapture. It doesn’t include me.
This used to be troubling but now its nothing.
Whatever Moses said rests like a refugee in his brain.
His trees seem to grasp the sky. His hope is scratching
new stories in the stained glass. The last tourists listen
to their guided earphones as if the static could tell them
what he was promised, but it’s nothing, nothing at all.

 

Japanese translation for meaning

Copyright © 2011-2014 by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted,  feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and, provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name @ http://jazzybeatchick.com and your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

 

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Jazz on Canvas ~ Acoustic and Visual Portraits of Jazz on the Brain

“We do not believe in ourselves until someone reveals that deep inside us something is valuable, worth listening to, worthy of our trust, sacred to our touch. Once we believe in ourselves we can risk curiosity, wonder, spontaneous delight or any experience that reveals the human spirit.”  ~ e.e. cummings

Jazz scented notes linger in the air of life’s story.  Brimming with lavender, jasmine, freesia and vanilla draws us deeper within creating a sense of enlightenment and a glimpse of who we are…  If we stay present and …

Listen Without Interpretations or Judgment …

Are you sure the news you listened to on the t.v. was what was actually being said?   How much information was diluted or distorted or filtered by your own experience?

In order to listen experientially with an open mind  you have a mindfulness meditative focus on what is actually being said ~ to be in that moment completely.   We must tune out interpretative listening because it stains and distorts  our understanding of the true meaning of the message. It is when as Michael Singer refers to “our roommate” in our brain is distracting and alluding us from listening to what is being said now.   This will allow us to be totally present and will lead to a deeper communication through all of our sensibilities.
jazz brain

 

Listen with a culturally attuned diversity in mind…

Diverse cultural communication may create barriers to communication but the beauty of jazz or music can transcend and overcome that barrier with a visceral knowledge and we develop a respect for all differences that reside in the “Soul” of  our universe.

jazz and creativity

 

Listen to what is not being said… the breaths  or space between the notes or words…

The art of listening intently or deliberately allows us to become  awakened to verbal and non-verbal cues, inflections, emphasis, and our joy and sorrow. It becomes a  part of the intuitive learning through observing and responding to is not being said and the physicality of the body language between yourself and others.

Jazz provides a cultivating spiritual perspective which embraces all of life and death that can transform our compassion and wellbeing of those who are suffering.  It has taught me to appreciate the real person inside of each of us and is the essence of  the true human being that is always present that has been distorted by physical and emotional states that may cloud our relationships.  What a way for us to embrace the mystery of life traveling on the life journey with the grace and gifts of spirit that God created in all of us.  Let us be…Peace Out!  JBC  8-)

Japanese translation for meaning

 

Copyright © 2011-2014 by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

 

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Poet’s Beat ~WORDS FOR JAZZ PERHAPS by Michael Longley feat. Art Farmer’s Darn That Dream

Abstract of Song

Abstract of Song

Many classical musicians believed that jazz was not to be evaluated on the same level as Puccini or Chopin jazz received a certain amount of respect from literary figures and classical musicians.  From the syncopated rhythms to the lyrical improvisation, jazz fascinated many people from “high society” in American culture.  With the elevation of this distinctly African-American art form came  respect and dignity that African Americans had often been deprived of.  So here’s to jazz and its wonderful and mysterious influence on contemporary visual & literary arts. Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

WORDS FOR JAZZ PERHAPS

by Michael Longley

 

I
Elegy for Fats Waller
Lighting up, lest all our hearts should break,
His fiftieth cigarette of the day,
Happy with so many notes at his beck
And call, he sits there taking it away,
The maker of immaculate slapstick.

With music and with such precise rampage
Across the deserts of the blues a trail
He blazes, towards the one true mirage,
Enormous on a nimble-footed camel
And almost refusing to be his age.

He plays for hours on end and though there be
Oases one part water, two parts gin,
He tumbles past to reign, wise and thirsty,
At the still centre of his loud dominion -
THE SHOOK, THE SHAKE, THE SHEIKH OF ARABY.

II
BILLIE HOLIDAY
(An Epitaph)
DEATH, LIKE ALL YOUR HABITS, CAME TO STAY,
DARED FACE YOUR MUSIC, TOOK YOUR BREATH AWAY.

III
BUD FREEMAN IN BELFAST
(November 1965)
Fog horn and factory siren intercept
Each fragile hoarded-up refrain. What else
Is there to do but let those notes erupt.

Until your fading last glissando settles
Among all other sounds – carefully wrapped
In the cotton wool from aspirin bottles?

IV
TO BESSIE SMITH
You bring from Chattanooga Tenessee
Your huge voice to the back of my mind
Where, like sea shells salvaged from the sea
As bright reminders of a few week’s stay,
Some random notes are all I ever find.
I couldn’t play your records every day.

I think of tra-ra-rossan, Inisheer,
Of Harris drenched by horizontal rain -
Those landscapes I must visit year by year.
I do not live with sounds so seasonal
Nor set up house for good. Your blues contain
Each longed-for holiday, each terminal.

Japanese translation for meaning

 

Copyright © 2011-2014 by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

 

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Mindfulness Meditation Riff Spa Sunday ~ Appreciating Jazz to Develop Compassion Through Acoustic/Visual Portraits

 “The story of the human race is the story of men and women selling themselves short.”  ~ Abraham Maslow

 

Cosmically designed Courtesy of Creative Commons - Fafa gallery

Cosmically designed Courtesy of Creative Commons – Fafa gallery

 

A successful alternative to psychotherapy today would be to listen to Jazz.   Listening to Jazz or Bach or your favorite music serves as a mindfulness practice. It begins with creating an intention of consciousness the difference is in mindfulness meditation is “Listening”  is unique and distinct from a mindfulness “Breathing” practice.

 

 

Building a Vocabulary

Jazz like all music is a universal language of energy, a “vibe” of emotions and happiness. It speaks to our core desires and feelings. It spans language barriers and political borders.  It is a powerful means through which beings, humans and animals,  can connect to one another.  In a mindfulness practice, you develop an internal and interrelational conversation and thought process focused on listening and seeing with our whole being developing a mutual understanding.  Jazz functions as the catalyst and our conversation is the processing and substrate to a deeper understanding.  This “vibe” or energy flows through Jazz is to heal and transform our lives on a daily basis

Courtesy of Monica Ivedt _Essence of Love and Compassion

Courtesy of Monica Ivedt _Essence of Love and Compassion

Visual Arts, Insight and Compassion

As with any great Art, Jazz touches the qualities of our experience that are beyond words. Wisdom, insight, love, fear and joy can all be a conversation traversing the subtle textures and vibrations of the musical palette. Appreciating  jazz and visual arts gives us more than an aesthetic pleasure ~ “Listening” is  an act of compassion.

In the “Year of Musical Thinking” memoir gave me the fundamental perspective and deeper appreciation and understanding  of jazz and life as I came to know it.  It is constantly changing and rearranging our visual and acoustic sensibilities giving us a unique insight into our personal experience with jazz.

Since 2003 the month of May has brought me through the death of my parents and living with Breast Cancer.   Here is what listening to jazz and visual arts has transformed and healed my life.  I invite you to join me and give a listen to what this song brings to where I am today.

We all suffer.  I particularly like jazz contemporary and classic styles.  It is a metaphor of life that is looking at life and understanding our own inner-world of thoughts, emotions and feelings. There are inner-terrains and vistas that help me to find clarity of shape, arrangement, composition, timbre, rhythm, bringing to light a catharsis and release through self expression and improvisation in my life.  Jazz is healing.  It is a communion between jazz arrangements and compositions that are orchestrating what kind of energy is extant  I believe the decision is just below the surface of thought, in the context of texture, vibe, energy and mindful attention itself  that creates for me a mindfulness practice.  Each song gives different energy in concert with what is going on inside our soul.  A sense of freedom from the anchors of life’s pain and suffering and feel suspended in time and space of contentment to where I am in this very moment.

Courtesy of Sara Zimmerman Healing & Energy

Courtesy of Sara Zimmerman Healing & Energy

 

 

Brain Research has documented the effects of deep listening to specific kinds of music (jazz) to be fundamentally good for our bodies, minds and bodies and spirits.  There is an emerging field of music therapy which is beginning to document the psychological and physical effects of listening to music.  Here are a few tips to develop a mindfulness relationship with music,

∞     Take 5 – set time aside to select a song and a chair, couch, by the marina…centering yourself.

∞     Creating a comfortable place to fully commit your attention to the music.  Designate the space as your own private concert hall. Light Candles and scent the air. It is what you feel would make this unique for you ~ a personal private place for contemplation and relaxation.

∞     Turn your phone, e-mail, etc. off so you are not distracted and the period of time you’ve chosen to meditate.

∞     Eat before to avoid getting hungry or thirsty in the middle of the piece.  Prepare a small snack and herbal tea to regulate your energy.  Dsignate what your Intension.  Allow any thoughts and images associated with this contemplation rise and fall through your awareness.  No judgment or critical thoughts.

∞     Take a few deep breaths and relax into the sensations of your body. Rest with your breath for a minute or two.

∞     If while listening  your attention wanders  gently remind yourself to return to the sounds and sensations of the music.

∞     If the music stirs your emotions or thoughts, you can include those inner experiences as an extension of the music and appreciation practice.

∞     When the music ends remember thank yourself and the musicians and composer for taking the time to listen. — Take a few minutes to digest the experience. You can do this by doing a breathing meditation or just relaxing. You can also write or journal about the experience if you’d like.

Thanks for taking time to let me share my personal mindfulness meditation of jazz with you.  You be the judge…does any portion ring true for you?  Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

 

Japanese translation for meaning

Copyright © 2011-2014 by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted, feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and please provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name or visual artist @ http://jazzybeatchick.com your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Jazz Matters ~ Jazz goes to College ~ Brubeck’s Master Class Jazz Audience Appreciation Proves Jazz Will Never Die!

“Dave Brubeck‘s quartets of the ’50s and ’60s probably introduced more college students to jazz than did any other group in jazz history. And, by the looks of it, he’s still a big draw among young people.  To be sure, it was a predominately older crowd that greeted the Brubeck quartet at Orchestra Hall Thursday night, but members of a much younger generation was well in evidence, too.  The great ovation the 76-year-old pianist received when he walked onstage, coming as it did from several generations gathered in one place, must be a unique phenomenon in jazz circles. Who else in jazz today draws an audience of such wide-ranging age and such a large audience? (The 2,550-seat hall was nearly sold out.)  Given the obvious affection Brubeck‘s audiences have for him, he could, of course, coast a bit in a concert like this and simply play familiar material – which he actually did in second half of the evening.”  Excerpt from “Brubeck’s melodic jazz has all-ages audience clamoring for more.”Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN)  October 10, 1997 | Anthony, Michael

Growing up I discovered that Jazz, like life is a mosaic.  I never felt from the musicians I met and watched that there would never come a time that Jazz would perish.  That mode of thinking is what makes Americans seem so fickle and in constant need of out doing oneself every time.  Jazz is immortal in a sense that it constantly revisits itself and is transformed and created anew through improvisation.  That is Jazz’s story.  Count Basie said It’s the way you play that makes it . . . Play like you play. Play like you think, and then you got it, if you’re going to get it. And whatever you get, that’s you, so that’s your story.  I learned at a young age that discovering your truth and living it is what your story is.  Of course the way in which you discover it comes from finding out who you are and what your passion is in life.  For me it is words, I love the sound, the shape, the timbre, the cadence, the tone and the rhythm that words create in my soul.  Give a listen as I describe the rehearsal session of The Shadow of Your Smile or Love Theme from The Sandpiper that won a Grammy Nomination in 1966. Intentional listening will give you notes of wonderful memories with tones and timbre of those things in our lives will always be there, it just needs the right sound to transcend immediate gratification and to hear the pure beautiful sounds of love and compassion,

Jazz has the same qualities and affect as words.  I discovered that in 1965 hearing my father downstairs at dawns first light sitting at the Grand Piano hitting each key composing and arranging and rearranging The Shadow of Your Smile for the orchestra to play at that day’s rehearsal.  He was so intent on the selecting the true and impeccable notes in his head to evoke an acoustic alchemy that would translate and caress leaving an impression on my soul.  It sounded fractured and abstract in those early mornings, after many disciplined hours it flourished into an amazing sound giving me goose bumps.  When the orchestra played it for the first time it was magnificent, it was sheer eminence.  It was an invitation to my imagination renewing my love for writing ~ cultivating a joy deep in my heart.  The studio fell silent. My father taped the baton 3 times, the piano begin to play on the downbeat, the cymbal washes the shore of time, the horns follow gently setting the tone….Dizzy’s cheeks puffed, trumpet poised as he began to play sending notes that create a wave of emotions.  Ralph J. Gleason from the Chronicle summed it up The 1965 Monterey Jazz Festival music clearly is designed to last.  This amalgam of the talents of Gillespie and Fuller are insurance that it will. The orchestra played the music at this session for all time, which is the way good jazz is always played.  Dad always asked me how it felt.  He wanted to hear if he was successful in invoking the affect and interaction between the musicians and the audience.  What do you feel?  You be the judge.  What do you see? Peace Out! 8)

______________________________

Copyright © 2011-2014 by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted,  feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and, provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name @ http://jazzybeatchick.com and your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Mindfulness Meditation RiffShot Spa Sunday (“MMRSS”) ~ Creativity & The Mind

Courtesy of Creative Commons ~ GuitarLady

Courtesy of Creative Commons ~ GuitarLady

 

I am in the midst of feeling the change of my life and season from winter transcending and embracing Spring and Summer.  I discovered this meditation to get your creativity flowing.  Each day serves as a testament to living our lives fully, accepting life in each moment embracing grace and gratitude for ourselves and others.  We look toward those who bring enlightenment to our lives and sharing It with others.  Blessings & Peace  JBC 8-)

 

Education Making the world a better place. Education, Creativity and the Mind. Richard Silberstein. Mindful Mindfulness Mindsight Creative. Interpersonal Neurobiology Early Childhood Brain Development — Neuro Science — with Peter Fonagy, Daniel Siegel, Antonio Damasio, Jaak Panksepp, Allan Schore, Alice Miller Barack Obama & James Heckmann. The following „richest” people have pledged to give the majority of their wealth to philanthropy. Paul G. Allen – Laura and John Arnold – Michael R. Bloomberg Ted Turner Georg Lucas Ayse Kok Fahrudin Radončić Ben S. Bernanke,

PAUL G. ALLEN
LAURA AND JOHN ARNOLD
MICHAEL R. BLOOMBERG
ELI AND EDYTHE BROAD
WARREN BUFFETT
MICHELE CHAN AND PATRICK SOON-SHIONG
BARRY DILLER AND DIANE VON FURSTENBERG
ANN AND JOHN DOERR
LARRY ELLISON
BILL AND MELINDA GATES
BARRON HILTON
JON AND KAREN HUNTSMAN
JOAN AND IRWIN JACOBS
GEORGE B. KAISER
ELAINE AND KEN LANGONE
GERRY AND MARGUERITE LENFEST
LORRY I. LOKEY
GEORGE LUCAS
ALFRED E. MANN
BERNIE AND BILLI MARCUS
THOMAS S. MONAGHAN ….
Japanese translation for meaning

Copyright © 2011-2014 by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted,  feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and, provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name @ http://jazzybeatchick.com and your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Jazz on Canvas ~ Creating & Experimenting with Album Cover Styles from the 1950’s Pop Artist Andy Warhol’s Sees Jazz Differently Sounds by Miles Davis performing “It Never Entered My Mind”

Andy Warhol designed three milestone album covers in the 1960s and ’70s: “The Velvet Underground & Nico,” with the image of the banana that you could peel, and two Rolling Stones LPs, including “Sticky Fingers,” with the provocative zipper that you could unzip….  But who knew that Warhol, the pioneer of Pop Art, drew more than 50 album covers over the span of his career – and not just for rock, but for classical music, opera and jazz? Those works are the subject of a lavishly illustrated, fastidiously documented book, “Andy Warhol: The Record Covers, 1949- 1987,” published jointly by Prestel and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. The author, Paul Marechal, is curator of the art collection at the Power Corporation of Canada, which consists mainly of French decorative art of the 18th and 19th centuries. ~ Fred Kaplan, New York Times @ The International Herald Tribune, April 25, 2009

 

Warhol_Progressive-Piano

Warhol_Progressive-Piano

The greatest gift I received during “My Year of Musical Thinking” was summer school in 1969 in New York City.  I attended the Rhodes School a private school located next door to the Museum of Modern Art.  I began seeing jazz and sounds transformed and recreated in wonderful shapes, colors that translated acoustic portraits of jazz life into Modern and Abstract visual experiences.  That summer I was introduced to Pop Art by Warhol and Abstract Art by Picasso and Romare Bearden and Jackson Pollack to name a few.  The mold had been cast and it calculated everything measure by measure into an imaginative and enchanted inner creative life that manifested in my writing and artist’s life.  Wha more can any of us ask for…Peace Out!  JBC

 

 

Warhol came to New York in 1949, fresh out of art school, the long-playing record had just hit the marketplace. Warhol called the big labels, offering to illustrate their covers.

He won an assignment right away, from Columbia Records, for an LP called “A Program of Mexican Music.” His drawings, of ancient drummers and dancers, were crude, but already they anticipated aspects of his later works.  He copied the figures from 16th-century Aztec sketches that he found in a Museum of Modern Art catalog, a forerunner of his tendency to make art from existing images, like the Marilyn Monroe photos and Campbell’s Soup cans. And he used a technique known as “blotted line” drawing, a basic form of printmaking that foretold his fascination with silk-screens.

Those early covers “have pizazz and elegance and a sneaky linearity, like Cocteau with a movement disorder,” said Wayne Koestenbaum, the author of a Warhol biography.

Warhol_The Story of Moondog

Warhol_The Story of Moondog

Warhol‘s cover for the jazz guitarist Kenny Burrell’s self- titled debut album on the Blue Note label, in 1956, was a drawing based on a photograph, as were many of Warhol‘s later portraits.

 

Warholkenny-burrell

Warholkenny-burrell

It was stylized, exaggerating the curves of Mr. Burrell’s guitar, the vibrations of its strings and the strumming of his fingers.

“Already you see the sense of movement, the low-angle perspective that’s very much associated with film or photographs,” Mr. Marechal said. It’s a precedent, he added, for Warhol‘s move a decade later into photographing pop stars and making movies.

warhol_monk-foster

warhol_monk-foster

The next year, on another Blue Note album cover, the saxophonist Johnny Griffin’s “Congregation,” Warhol – again working from a photo – painted fragments of colored flowers on Griffin’s shirt, which not only imbued the drawing with a splashy rhythm but also foreshadowed the giant flowers that Warhol would paint, over and over, in the following decade.

Warhol used the album cover as a testing ground and template for the styles he was instrumental in the development and flourished  in the Pop Culture Age to come after he crossed the boundaries of commercial illustrator to museum artist where he continued his work.

Warhol‘s album covers mirrored and incorporated  other forms of art, reflecting and visualizing the broad spectrum Popular Culture of his times, i.e., from innocent chaos of the late 1940s and the muted cool tones of the ’50s to the overwhelming exuberance of the ’60s – the age reflecting the Beats and Hippies incorporating technological advancement of stereo, moon shots and color TV.

warhol_COol-Gabriels

warhol_COol-Gabriels

Warhol_Johnny-Griffin235677

During the 1960’s and 70’s Andy Warhol designed three milestone album covers:   “The Velvet Underground & Nico,” with the image of the banana that you could peel, and two Rolling Stones LPs, including “Sticky Fingers,” with the provocative zipper that you could unzip.

Paul Marechal author and curator of the art collection at the Power Corporation of Canada, which consists mainly of French decorative art of the 18th and 19th centuries.   Those works are the subject of a lavishly illustrated, fastidiously documented book, “AndyWarhol: The Record Covers, 1949- 1987,” published jointly by Prestel and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.

Warhol_ frank lovejoynightbeat12437378

In 2006, Mr. Marechal met Stephane Aquin at an art exhibition in Marseille.  Aquin, the curator of contemporary art at the Montreal Museum of Fine Art was impressed and organized a show  on the album covers and Warhol’s work and the role music played in all of Warhol‘s work. The was entitled” “Warhol Live,” is on display at the de Young Museum in San Francisco and  open at the Warhol Museum  June, 2006.

Warholcount-basie

Warholcount-basie

Warhol  gained fame as a commercial illustrator. His highly successful ads for the I. Miller shoe company – flamboyant, staccato drawings of shoes in all shapes and sizes – garnered him The Art Directors Club’s most prestigious honor in 1957. After that came spreads in fashion magazines, lucrative window displays for Tiffany and Bonwit Teller and eventually his first gallery shows.
Japanese translation for meaning

Copyright © 2011-2014 by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted,  feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and, provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name @ http://jazzybeatchick.com and your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.

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Poet’s Beat ~ “Hanging Fire” by Audre Lorde Accompanied by Nina Simone “These Times They Are A Changing”

39 Notes Courtesy of artismyaddiction by Cherrybam

39 Notes Courtesy of artismyaddiction by Cherrybam

“For women, then, poetry is not a luxury. It is a vital necessity of our existence. It forms the quality of the light within which we predicate our hopes and dreams toward survival and change, first made into language, then into idea, then into more tangible action. Poetry is the way we help give name to the nameless so it can be thought. The farthest horizons of our hopes and fears are cobbled by our poems, carved from the rock experiences of our daily lives.”  Audre Lorde

For me, Feminism growing up in the 60’s with respect to the Black Culture was steeped in the Civil Rights Movement.  It was separate from the Feminist Movement because race was the primary focus.  The movement encompassed a mosaic of ethnicities within American life.  Audre came from Caribbean roots.  Lorde was a revolutionary within the revolution. While other activists and artists who considered themselves radicals had their hands full promoting Black power or the feminist revolution, Lorde promoted Black feminism.   Lorde emphasized the need for Black lesbian feminism by describing herself as a “blackfeminist, lesbian, mother, poet warrior.”  It became evident that black feminists were a subset of Civil Rights movement and was borne out of necessity and classification purposes.  I do not ascribe to the feminist point of view however, I do believe in equality with respect to Civil Rights and in the Art world as well as the sociopolitical agendas that prevailed during those times. Ms. Lorde could have added first-generation immigrant and cancer patient. In The Cancer Journals, published in 1980, Lorde addressed the traumatic experience of having a mastectomy. Breast cancer was the illness that finally killed Lorde in 1992, at age 58, after a 14-year battle.  When it comes to breast cancer, it doesn’t matter how many labels you would refer to oneself because it has the same devastating effects no matter what race you are.  Peace Out!  JBC 8-)

 

 

Hanging Fire

by Audre Lorde

 

 

I am fourteen
and my skin has betrayed me
the boy I cannot live without
still sucks his tumb
in secret
how come my knees are
always so ashy
what if I die
before the morning comes
and momma’s in the bedroom
with the door closed.

I have to learn how to dance
in time for the next party
my room is too small for me
suppose I de before graduation
they will sing sad melodies
but finally
tell the truth about me
There is nothing I want to do
and too much
that has to be done
and momma’s in the bedroom
with the door closed.

Nobody even stops to think
about my side of it
I should have been on Math Team
my marks were better than his
why do I have to be
the one
wearing braces
I have nothing to wear tomorrow
will I live long enough
to grow up
and momma’s in the bedroom
with the door closed.

Japanese translation for meaning

 

Copyright © 2011-2014 by Jannat Marie/Jazzybeatchick. All rights Reserved.

This material has been copyrighted,  feel free to share it with others; it can be distributed via social media or pingbacks or added to websites; please do not change the original content and, provide appropriate credit by including the author’s name @ http://jazzybeatchick.com and your readers shall not be charged by you under any circumstance.